English, MA

Program Description

The MA in English Program offers all candidates the opportunity to grow intellectually and creatively through the advanced study of language, literature, and writing. The program offers a variety of opportunities designed to:

  • further students’ understanding of writing, composition theory, linguistics, literature, and literary theory;
  • encourage awareness and application of transnational and/or border studies perspectives;
  • develop accomplished teachers of English at the secondary and community college levels;
  • prepare skilled professional/technical writers and writing trainers;
  • provide students with the background and skills needed to pursue terminal degrees in English or American Studies.

The English MA faculty is committed to an integrated understanding of English as a field of study.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the program, students will demonstrate:

  • proficiency in critical reading, writing, and thinking at the graduate level;
  • understanding and application of core knowledge, vocabulary, and concepts in the discipline;
  • proficiency in scholarly methods of research and inquiry; and
  • appropriate preparation for individual career paths within the profession.

Good Standing

Students must maintain a 3.0 (“B”) grade point average to remain in good standing in the English MA Program. Students whose cumulative GPA drops below 3.0 will be placed on scholastic probation. If, while on scholastic probation, a student’s GPA for any semester again drops below 3.0, he or she will be forced to withdraw from the university for at least one year before reapplying for admission. Grades are not replaced when repeated at the graduate level.

For Additional Information

Website:
http://cla.tamucc.edu/english/pages/english_graduate.html

Campus Address:
Faculty Center (FC), Room 267
phone: (361) 825-2483

Mailing Address:
English MA Program Coordinator
Department of English, College of Liberal Arts
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi
6300 Ocean Drive
Corpus Christi, Texas 78412-5813

E-mail:
susan.garza@tamucc.edu

Admission Requirements

  1. Applicants must comply with the university procedures and requirements in applying for admission to the English Graduate Program. Application is made through the Office of Recruitment and Admissions, with duplicate materials submitted to the English Graduate Program Coordinator.
  2. Applicants must submit through the Office of Recruitment and Admissions a portfolio that includes:
    • A letter (2-4 pages long) from the candidate addressed to the English Graduate Committee introducing the candidate and describing:
      • academic background,
      • short and long-term professional goals,
      • the connection between the candidate’s short and long term personal or professional goals and the candidate’s desire to pursue graduate study in English at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, and
      • additional details about the candidate’s background, language proficiency, and other personal information relating to individual/career goals that may have influenced the decision to pursue graduate study.
    • A recent academic writing sample of at least 2000 words, which the applicant believes displays exemplary analytic and stylistic features.
    • Three letters of recommendation.
  3. Admission to the program will be granted based upon undergraduate performance, writing ability, demonstrated commitment to professional goals, and other favorable indicators presented in the portfolio. All criteria will be considered, and no factor will be assigned a specific weight. Based upon the English Graduate Committee’s evaluation of the student’s application portfolio, the student will be unconditionally admitted, conditionally admitted, or denied admission. If the student is conditionally admitted, the conditions of acceptance will be stated in writing.
  4. The English Graduate Committee may recommend that applicants lacking the English undergraduate major complete certain upper-division undergraduate English course work before applying to the program.
  5. A limited number of scholarships and graduate assistantships are available to first-year students. Application should be made directly to the English Graduate Program Coordinator.

Program Requirements

The candidate for the English MA degree must complete 36 graduate hours in English with a “B” average. Credit for no more than one “C” earned at this university may be applied to the degree.*  In addition to the 9 hours of core courses, students choosing the thesis option will take 9 hours of core courses,  6 hours in Writing studies, 6 hours in Literary Studies, 9 hours of English electives, and 6 hours of ENGL 5390 (Thesis), 3 hours in one semester and 3 hours in a separate semester.  Students choosing the non-thesis option will take 9 hours of core courses, 6 hours in Writing Studies, 6 hours in Literary Studies, and 15 hours of English electives.  A maximum of 3 credit hours of ENGL 5396 Individual Study (1-3 sch) may count toward the degree.

Core Courses
ENGL 5301Theory and Practice I: Literary Studies3
ENGL 5303Theory and Practice II: Writing Studies3
Select one of the following Linguistics courses:3
Seminar in Sociolinguistics
Introduction to Linguistics
Seminar in Applied Linguistics
Writing Studies and Literary Studies
Writing Studies
Select 6 hours of Writing Studies courses from the following:6
Writing Assessment
BASIC WRITING THEORY AND PEDAGOGY
Digital Rhetoric
Rhetoric
TOPICS AND GENRES IN RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION
Creative Writing
Professional Writing
Grant Writing
Seminar in Sociolinguistics 1
Seminar in Applied Linguistics 1
Practicum for Composition Instructors
Literary Studies
Select 6 hours of Literary Studies courses from the following: 26
British Literature Before 1660
British Literature 1660 - 1830
British Poetry and Fiction 1900-Present
British Literature 1830 - 1900
American Literature to 1865
American Literature 1865-1940
American Literature 1945-Present
TOPICS AND GENRES IN LITERATURE
Electives
Select 9 hours of electives (Thesis Option) or 15 hours of electives (Non-Thesis) from any of the courses listed above in Writing Studies, Literary Studies, and Linguistics or any listed below: 29-15
Summer Institute Writing Workshop
Seminar in Sociolinguistics
Introduction to Linguistics
Individual Study
Total Hours30-36

Exit Requirements

In addition to meeting the university requirement of a 3.0 GPA or greater, candidates for the MA in English must meet the following exit requirements:

  1. Thesis-option students must defend the thesis in an oral examination; a majority of the thesis committee members must pass the thesis and its defense. Candidates will submit an approved bound copy of the completed thesis to the English Graduate Program Coordinator and the Bell Library.  Prior to that submission, students will work with the College of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Advisor to ensure that their thesis meets the publishing requirements set forth by the University.
  2. Non-thesis students must pass a written comprehensive exam.

The department recommends that students consult with their faculty mentor to determine which choice will work best, given their career goals, time constraints and other concerns.

Written Comprehensive Examination

The English comprehensive examination measures students’ ability to integrate, synthesize, and reflect on the learning achieved during the program. While students receive a solid foundation in both Writing Studies and Literary Studies, they will become more specialized in one of the two areas through independent reading and research in preparation for the comprehensive exam.  They should consult with their graduate advisor early in the program on the specific nature and purpose of the comprehensive examination. Full details of the English MA Comprehensive Examination may be obtained from the English Graduate Program Coordinator or from the English graduate handbook.

Thesis

The thesis may be an appropriate choice for students depending on their long-term scholarly goals, writing skills, targeted doctoral programs, and plans for further specialization. Students considering a thesis should seek the help of their graduate mentor as early as possible in selecting appropriate coursework. Students may apply to write a thesis after completing 18 hours of coursework. Once accepted as a thesis candidate, students are expected to work closely with their committee in designing and executing the thesis. The 6 credit hours toward the thesis (ENGL 5395) must be taken in two separate semesters. An oral defense of the thesis will be scheduled at the end of the second semester or when the committee chair determines that the student is ready to defend. Thesis guidelines and application forms are available from the English Graduate Program Coordinator or from the Office of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. 

ENGL 5395Thesis (semester 1)3
ENGL 5395Thesis (semester 2)3
9 hours of electives (See above Part Two and Part Three)9
Oral Defense of Thesis

Graduate Degree Mentor

Upon admission into the program, the student will be notified of his/her mentor, who will be a member of the English graduate faculty.  Students are expected to meet with their mentor once a semester as they advance through the program.  The mentor will work closely with the student to ensure that all degree requirements are met and that each student pursues the most advantageous course of study for his/her future goals.

Degree Plan

Each student working toward a graduate degree is responsible for meeting the requirements outlined in the degree plan. The student is also responsible for meeting all deadlines: program application, examination, and graduate application. If the deadlines for examination and graduation application are not met, the student will not graduate that semester. In no instance will a student be admitted to degree candidacy without an approved and completed degree plan on file in the office of the Dean of College of Liberal Arts. Amendments to the degree plan must be proposed by the student and approved by the Graduate Committee or program advisor and the Dean of College of Liberal Arts. Amendments to the degree plan must be proposed by the student and approved by the Graduate Committee or program advisor or college dean.

Transfer of Credit

In addition to the University’s general policy on transfer of credit, the following regulations will apply to the MA in English program: Up to 9 semester hours of graduate-level study may be transferred from other regionally accredited institutions of higher education if appropriate to the degree. No course with a grade of less than a “B,” and no course that has counted toward the earning of another graduate degree, will be accepted as transfer credit. Credit that is more than seven years old at the time of graduation will not be counted toward the MA degree.

Courses

ENGL 5301  Theory and Practice I: Literary Studies  
3 Semester Credit Hours  

INTRODUCES STUDENTS TO TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP IN LITERARY STUDY THROUGH A SURVEY OF CRITICAL DEBATES IN LITERARY THEORY.  OFFERED IN THE FALL.

ENGL 5302  BIBLIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

A survey of the basic techniques of research and scholarly procedures in composition studies, language, and literature. Offered in Fall.

ENGL 5303  Theory and Practice II: Writing Studies  
3 Semester Credit Hours  

INTRODUCES STUDENTS TO TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP IN WRITING STUDIES THROUGH A SURVEY OF CRITICAL DEBATES IN WRITING STUDIES SCHOLARSHIP, WITH SPECIAL ATTENTION TO CURRENT RESEARCH ON COMPOSING AND ITS PEDAGOGICAL IMPLICATIONS.  OFFERED IN SPRING SEMESTERS ONLY.

ENGL 5310  LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

An examination of current debates in literary theory, with emphasis on methods such as new criticism, formalism, Marxism, as well as more recent theories such as post-structuralism, feminism, and postcolonialism. Offered in fall.

ENGL 5340  British Literature Before 1660  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

EXAMINATION OF POETRY, DRAMA, OR PROSE WRITTEN BEFORE 1660.  SAMPLE TOPICS:  THE GLOBAL RENAISSANCE, DIGITAL SHAKESPEARE, WRITING WOMEN IN EARLY ENGLISH LITERATURE. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5341  SHAKESPEARE  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Studies in selected comedies, histories, or tragedies by Shakespeare. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5342  British Literature 1660 - 1830  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

STUDIES OF MAJOR WRITERS AND TEXTS OF THE BRITISH LONG EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (1660 - 1832). PRIMARY FOCUS IS ON THE LITERARY TEXTS, AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE PERIOD, WITH OPPORTUNITIES TO BRING IN CURRENT LITERARY THEORIES AND CRITICISM.  SAMPLE TOPICS:  GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN THE NOVEL, GOTHIC FICTION, TRAVEL WRITING.  MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5343  British Poetry and Fiction 1900-Present  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

EXPLORATION OF ONE OR MORE WRITERS, GENRES, LITERARY MOVEMENTS, ISSUES, OR IDEOLOGIES OF THE 20TH CENTURY. INCLUDES WRITERS FROM THE BRITISH ISLES AND THE COMMONWEALTH. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5344  British Literature 1830 - 1900  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

STUDIES OF BRITISH FICTION, POETRY, AND PROSE WRITTEN BETWEEN 1830 AND 1900 AND THE SOCIAL FORCES—DOMESTIC, ECONOMIC, POLITICAL, RELIGIOUS, SCIENTIFIC—THAT INFLUENCED AND WERE INFLUENCED BY THESE WORKS.  SAMPLE TOPICS:  SOCIAL CHANGE AND THE VICTORIAN BODY; VICTORIAN FUN; VICTORIANS AND EMPIRE. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT WHEN TOPICS VARY.  

ENGL 5346  American Literature to 1865  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

READINGS IN ONE OR MORE WRITERS, GENRES, LITERARY MOVEMENTS, ISSUES, OR IDEOLOGIES OF THE PERIOD. SAMPLE TOPICS: TRANSOCEANIC AMERICAS: LITERATURES AMID THE SPANISH EMPIRE, AMERICAN PRINT CULTURES, MEDICINE AND EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5347  American Literature 1865-1940  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

STUDIES IN ONE OR MORE WRITERS, GENRES, LITERARY MOVEMENTS, ISSUES, OR IDEOLOGIES OF THE PERIOD. SAMPLE TOPICS: THE LOST GENERATION, MODERNISM AND THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE, FALKNER AND THE SOUTH. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5348  American Literature 1945-Present  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

EXPLORATION OF ONE OR MORE MAJOR WRITERS, GENRES, LITERARY MOVEMENTS, ISSUES, OR IDEOLOGIES SINCE WORLD WAR II. SAMPLE TOPICS: EXPERIMENTAL NARRATIVE, US-LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE, THE POSTMODERN NOVEL. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5349  TOPICS AND GENRES IN LITERATURE  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

STUDIES IN TOPICS AND GENRES THAT SPAN MORE THAN ONE LITERARY PERIOD AND/OR INCLUDE WORKS FROM BOTH BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE. SAMPLE TOPICS: CROSSING BORDERS, CROSSING NATIONS, THE CITY IN LITERATURE, QUEER THEORY. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5360  Writing Assessment  
3 Semester Credit Hours  

STUDY AND PRACTICE IN METHODS BY WHICH WRITTEN TEXTS ARE EVALUATED AND THE EVALUATION USED FOR INSTRUCTIONAL PURPOSES. METHODS RANGE FROM CLASSROOM TECHNIQUES TO FORMAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES (HOLISTIC, PRIMARY TRAIT, PORTFOLIO, ETC.).

ENGL 5361  BASIC WRITING THEORY AND PEDAGOGY  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

STUDIES IN THE THEORY AND PEDAGOGY OF THE TEACHING OF DEVELOPMENTAL WRITING. FOCUS CENTERS ON THE POLITICAL, SOCIOLINGUISTIC, AND EDUCATIONAL HISTORY AND STATUS OF BASIC WRITERS.

ENGL 5362  Digital Rhetoric  
3 Semester Credit Hours  

EXPLORES THE DYNAMICS OF ONLINE, NETWORKED READING AND WRITING PRACTICES BY EXAMINING THE RHETORICAL, SOCIAL, CULTURAL, POLITICAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF DIGITAL TEXTS AND EXAMINES ISSUES OF TECHNOLOGY AND LITERACY IN DIGITAL SPACES. STUDENTS WILL CREATE DIGITAL TEXTS IN A VARIETY OF MEDIA, GENRES, AND CONTEXTS.

ENGL 5363  Rhetoric  
3 Semester Credit Hours  

EXAMINATION OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN TRADITIONS IN RHETORIC AND THEIR APPLICATION TO WRITTEN DISCOURSE. TOPICS FOCUS ON CONTRIBUTIONS OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN RHETORICIANS, WRITTEN LITERACY, AND THE INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF WRITTEN INSTRUCTION.

ENGL 5366  Visual Rhetoric  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP A BROAD UNDERSTANDING OF THE DEFINITION OF VISUAL RHETORIC, LEARN TO ANALYZE TEXTS BY IDENTIFYING THE VISUAL ELEMENTS THAT COMPRISE TEXTS, UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE VISUAL RHETORIC, AND CREATE THEIR OWN TEXTS.

ENGL 5367  Summer Institute Writing Workshop  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

THIS COURSE IS THE SUMMER INSTITUTE OF THE COASTAL BEND WRITING PROJECT, AFFILIATED WITH THE NATIONAL WRITING PROJECT. IT IS A WRITING WORKSHOP DESIGNED FOR TEACHERS OF ALL LEVELS (PRE-K THROUGH UNIVERSITY LEVEL) AND SUBJECT AREAS, MEANING WE WILL STUDY AND PRACTICE WRITING IN WAYS THAT BENEFIT TEACHERS PERSONALLY AND PROFESSIONALLY. IN THIS WORKSHOP, WE WILL STUDY THEORY AND EFFECTIVE PRACTICES IN WRITING PEDAGOGY, AND FOCUS ON IMPROVING PARTICIPANTS' WRITING AND RESEARCH SKILLS. AS A SITE OF THE NATIONAL WRITING PROJECT, THIS COURSE IS BACKED BY A NATIONAL NETWORK OF SCHOLARS AND DATA-BASED PRACTICES.

ENGL 5369  TOPICS AND GENRES IN RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

EXPLORATION OF SPECIFIC ISSUES AND PROBLEMS IN RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION STUDIES. SAMPLE TOPICS: ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH, GENDER AND WRITING. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5372  COMPOSITION THEORY AND PEDOGOGY  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

COMPOSITION THEORY AND PEDAGOGY A study of works by contemporary rhetoric/composition specialists, with special regard to the theoretical basis of composing and its pedagogical implications. Offered in Spring.

ENGL 5375  Creative Writing  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

A STUDIO APPROACH TO WRITING FICTION, NON-FICTION, AND POETRY, WITH AN EMPHASIS ON THE ELEMENTS AND CRITICAL TERMINOLOGY OF EACH GENRE.

ENGL 5376  Professional Writing  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

WORKSHOP ON THE GENRES AND PRACTICES OF PROFESSIONAL WRITING AND COMMUNICATION.

ENGL 5377  Grant Writing  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

AN ADVANCED WORKSHOP ON THE GRANT PROPOSAL WRITING PROCESS, INCLUDING IDENTIFYING SOURCES OF FUNDING, CONDUCTING RESEARCH TO SUPPORT FUNDING APPLICATIONS, DATA ANALYSIS, TAILORING EACH PROPOSAL TO A SPECIFIC FUNDING AGENCY, AND THE REQUIREMENTS OF ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION. STUDENTS WILL RECEIVE EXPERIENCE WRITING ACTUAL PROPOSALS ON BEHALF OF LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS AND AGENCIES.

ENGL 5380  Seminar in Sociolinguistics  
3 Semester Credit Hours  

EXPLORATION OF TOPICS RELATED TO LANGUAGE IN SOCIETY, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLINGUISTICS, LANGUAGE VARIATION, DISCLOSURE ANALYSIS, LANGUAGE PLANNING AND POLICY, MULTILINGUALISM, AND WORLD ENGLISHES.  MAY BE REPEATED WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5381  Introduction to Linguistics  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

INTRODUCES STUDENTS TO THE NATURE AND BEHAVIOR OF HUMAN LANGUAGE; COVERS TOPICS IN PHONETICS, MORPHOLOGY, SYNTAX, SEMANTICS, SOCIOLINGUISTICS, NEUROLINGUISTICS, AND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION.

ENGL 5385  Seminar in Applied Linguistics  
3 Semester Credit Hours  

EXPLORATION OF TOPICS BROADLY COVERED IN THE FIELD OF APPLIED LINGUISTICS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE (BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO) LANGUAGE ASSESSMENT, GRAMMAR, SECOND LANGUAGE WRITING, LANGUAGE AND GENDER, CORPUS LINGUISTICS, AND SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. MAY BE REPEATED WHEN TOPICS VARY.

ENGL 5392  Practicum for Composition Instructors  
3 Semester Credit Hours  

PRACTICAL TRAINING FOR ENGLISH TEACHING ASSISTANTS. A SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITION AND RHETORICAL THEORY WITH PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE FIRST-YEAR CLASSROOM.

ENGL 5393  General Studies Literature Instructors Practicum  
3 Semester Credit Hours  

THIS PRACTICUM WILL PREPARE AND SUPPORT GRADUATE STUDENTS WHO WILL WORK AS FIRST-TIME GRADUATE ASSISTANTS IN THE GENERAL STUDIES LITERATURE PROGRAM.

ENGL 5395  Thesis  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

THE THESIS IS A SCHOLARLY OR CRITICAL PROJECT INVOLVING 6 CREDIT HOURS (TAKEN IN TWO SEPARATE SEMESTERS) AT THE FINAL STAGES OF THE GRADUATE PROGRAM. GRADE ASSIGNED WILL BE "CREDIT" (CR) OR "NO CREDIT" (NC).

ENGL 5396  Individual Study  
1-3 Semester Credit Hours  

INDIVIDUAL STUDY, READING OR RESEARCH WITH FACULTY DIRECTION AND EVALUATION. TO RECEIVE PROGRAM CREDIT FOR THE MA IN ENGLISH, STUDENTS MUST HAVE COMPLETED THE ENGLISH CORE. CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE IS LIMITED TO 3 HOURS IN ANY DEGREE PLAN. OFFERED ON APPLICATION TO AND APPROVAL OF THE PROGRAM COORDINATOR.

ENGL 5399  WORKSHOP  
1-3 Semester Credit Hours (1-3 Lecture Hours)  

Variable topics in English, offered in a practical, workshop setting when there is sufficient demand. Grade assigned will be “credit” (CR) or “no credit” (NC).