Mechanical Engineering Technology, BS

Program Description

The Engineering Technology Council of the American Society for Engineering Education defines Engineering Technology as the profession in which knowledge of mathematics and natural sciences gained by higher education, experience, and practices is devoted primarily to the implementation and extension of existing technology for the benefit of humanity. Engineering technology focuses on the applied aspects of science and engineering to prepare graduates for practice in product improvement, manufacturing, and engineering operational functions. Engineering technologists are suited for industries that deal with application, manufacturing, implementation, engineering operation, sales, and production.

The Mechanical Engineering Technology degree is offered in both the traditional face-to-face format and an online format for the upper-division courses.  The fully-online courses form a competency-based education program in which students receive credit for courses when specific competencies are demonstrated, and receive the degree when all degree-level competencies are demonstrated.  In some cases, students may be able to take traditional courses for credit in the competency-based education program. 

The goal of Engineering Technology is to prepare well educated, highly skilled, and socially and professionally responsible engineering technologists from a diverse population of students to create productive and rewarding careers. Graduates will be well grounded in the fundamentals of engineering, mathematics, science, communications, and problem solving. To create continuous improvement, the program uses input from employers, alumni, and the Industrial Advisory Committee. Engineering Technology is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, www.abet.org.

Contact Information

Engineering Technology Program, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, TX 78412-5797. Phone: (361) 825-5849. Web: http://entc.tamucc.edu/

Mechanical Engineering Technology

Mechanical Engineering Technology graduates will exemplify the attributes previously described.

Program Educational Objectives

Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) are statements that describe what graduates are expected to accomplish within a few years of graduation.

The Program Educational Objectives for B.S. Mechanical Engineering Technology program are:

  1. Within two years of graduation from TAMU-CC, our graduates who have chosen to pursue a career in mechanical engineering technology, or a related field, will be working in industry, government, construction, or other professional service, in the areas of design, manufacture, sales, installation, operation and/or maintenance of complex, high-value systems.
  2. Within five years of graduation from TAMU-CC, our graduates who have chosen to pursue a career in mechanical engineering technology or a related field will have:
    1. advanced in their careers as indicated by obtaining promotions and positions of leadership, awards, recognitions as subject matter experts, and/or registration as professional engineers or in other professional disciplines; or by entrepreneurial activities, products or processes developed, or patents;
    2. demonstrated the ability to increase their knowledge and expertise through continuing education or advanced degrees; and
    3. contributed to the improvement of the profession and of society through participation and service in professional and public organizations and through mentoring.

Student Learning Outcomes

Student Outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation.  These relate to the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program. 

Graduates of the B.S. Mechanical Engineering Technology program will have:

  1. an ability to apply knowledge, techniques, skills and modern tools of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to solve broadly-defined engineering problems appropriate to the discipline;
  2. an ability to design systems, components, or processes meeting specified needs for broadly-defined engineering problems appropriate to the discipline;
  3. an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in broadly-defined technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature;
  4. an ability to conduct standard tests, measurements, and experiments and to analyze and interpret the results to improve processes; and
  5. an ability to function effectively as a member as well as a leader on technical teams.

Competency-Based Education Program for BS Mechanical Engineering Technology (CBE MCET)

A competency-based education (CBE) program is one in which specific, concrete competencies are defined.  The top-level competencies are the ABET student learning outcomes listed above.  Subject-specific sub-competencies are identified and assessed in each of the CBE MCET courses.  When a student demonstrates the competencies for a specific course, the student passes the course.  When all of the competencies for the degree have been demonstrated, the student receives the degree.  The CBE MCET program is being offered for the upper-division (3000- and 4000-level) courses.  Once a student has completed the first two years of the traditional MCET BS program as described below, the student may opt for the CBE MCET program.  Each of the courses in the CBE MCET program, with the exception of certain laboratory classes described below, may be completed online.  

A student must apply for the CBE program in MCET.  The student

  • Must be admitted as a student to TAMU-CC.
  • Must indicate a positive decision to apply for the CBE MCET program, either through ApplyTexas or a change of major form if student is already at TAMU-CC. 
  • Must have completed all core courses and all lower-division courses as listed below under “Prior Course Completion.” 
  • Must have a 2.5 GPA in all coursework that applies to the program (core courses and lower-division courses that will be counted towards the program), whether taken at TAMU-CC or elsewhere.

Credit By Examination: Some courses will have an online pre-test that students can take to earn college credit for that course. The test will be the equivalent of a comprehensive final exam that will test students on all competencies related to the course. The pre-test will be proctored according to the same standard as all other tests taken in the course. If students pass the pre-test, they will receive credit and not be required to take the course. The fee for taking the pre-test in each course must be paid by the student and may range up to $300 per exam. The student should contact the office of the Department of Engineering or the Office of Distance Education and Learning Technologies at TAMU-CC to determine the exact cost of the pre-test.

Credit By Portfolio: For the courses listed below, it is possible that through experience on the job (such as running a process unit in a plant or working in a machine shop), the student might have acquired the competencies in a particular course and therefore be able to obtain credit by submitting examples of work, certified by a supervisor, that illustrate the competencies in the course. The competencies for these courses may be found on the program website, and students given the opportunity to submit portfolios for evaluation (at the cost of an evaluation fee up to $300). The supervisor must be approved by the Engineering faculty as having the necessary qualifications to validate the work submitted by the student.  The portfolio(s) submitted by the student must demonstrate that the student has mastered the competencies in the class, as published on the program website.

ENTC 3220Thermal-Fluids Laboratory2
ENTC 3302Manufacturing Processes3
ENTC 4210Solid Mechanics Laboratory2
ENTC 4415Project Justification and Management4
ENTC 4350Capstone Projects3

Because of the nature of the last two courses, credit by portfolio must be obtained for both courses and cannot be obtained for each course individually. 

Student Learning Outcomes

The student learning outcomes for the CBE MCET program are the same as for the traditional BS in MCET. These student outcomes will be met by the demonstration of specific competencies in each of the courses in the CBE MCET program.

General Requirements

A summary of the hours necessary for graduation follows:

The specific requirements for each aspect of the Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology are indicated below.

Requirements Credit Hours
Core Curriculum Program 42
First-Year Seminars (when applicable)1 0-2
Common Engineering Technology Courses 31
Required Mechanical Engineering Technology Courses 36
Technical Elective Block 12-13
Total Credit Hours 121-124

Program Requirements

The courses that are considered to be in the major field of study are all MATH, CHEM, PHYS, COSC, ENTC, ENGR, EEEN, and MEEN courses in the curriculum listed below (any ENGR, MEEN, or EEEN courses taken to fulfill MCET degree requirements must be approved by the program coordinator and the department chair).  

The specific requirements for each aspect of the Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology are indicated below. Students are encouraged to take the NCEES (National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying) Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during their senior year. The FE exam, http://ncees.org/exams/fe-exam/, is the first step in the process that leads to the P.E. license.

Full-time, First-year Students
UNIV 1101First-Year Seminar I *1
UNIV 1102First-Year Seminar II *1
Core Curriculum Program
University Core Curriculum42
Engineering Technology students must take: 1
Calculus I (3-hour lecture component)
University Physics I (3-hour lecture component)
University Physics II (3-hour lecture component)
Common Engineering Technology Courses
MATH 2413Calculus I (1 hour laboratory component)1
PHYS 2425University Physics I (1 hour laboratory component)1
PHYS 2426University Physics II (1 hour laboratory component)1
MATH 2414Calculus II4
ENGR 1211Introduction to Engineering2
ENGR 1312Engineering Graphics I3
COSC 1330Programming for Scientists, Engineers, and Mathematicians3
CHEM 1411General Chemistry I *4
ENGR 2460Circuit Analysis4
ENGR 3316Thermodynamics3
ENTC 4446Control Systems I4
ENTC 4415Project Justification and Management4
ENTC 4350Capstone Projects3
Required Mechanical Engineering Technology Courses
ENTC 23253
ENTC 23263
ENGR 3322Materials Science3
ENTC 3302Manufacturing Processes3
or ENGR 3350 Manufacturing Processes
ENTC 3220Thermal-Fluids Laboratory2
ENTC 3306Fluid Mechanics3
or ENGR 3315 Fluid Mechanics
ENTC 3308Strength of Materials3
or ENGR 3320 Strength of Materials
ENTC 3455Solid Modeling and Finite Elements4
ENTC 4210Solid Mechanics Laboratory2
ENTC 4320Heat Transfer3
ENTC 4330Solid Mechanics3
ENTC 4360Mechanical System Design3
Technical Elective Block
Any upper division 3 hour Math, Science or Mechanical Engineering courses.3
Select three of the following:9
Robotics and Automation
Programmable Logic Controllers
Energy Conversion
Mechanical System Design
Selected Topics
Total Hours128

Competency-Based Education Program for BS Mechanical Engineering Technology (CBE MCET)

Prior Course Completion

A student must apply for admission to the CBE MCET program.  Prior to being admitted to the program, the student must complete all TAMU-CC core curriculum requirements and the following courses or their equivalents (those courses which satisfy the core requirements for mathematics, life and physical sciences, and the component area option (CAO) are also listed, for completeness).

CHEM 1411General Chemistry I *4
ENGR 1211Introduction to Engineering2
ENGR 1312Engineering Graphics I3
ENTC 23250-3
or ENGR 2325 Statics
ENTC 23260-3
or ENGR 2326 Dynamics
ENTC 2414Circuit Analysis I4
or ENGR 2460 Circuit Analysis
MATH 2413Calculus I4
MATH 2414Calculus II4
PHYS 2425University Physics I4
PHYS 2426University Physics II4
COSC 1330Programming for Scientists, Engineers, and Mathematicians3

Program Requirements

Common Engineering Technology Courses - CBE
ENGR 3316Thermodynamics3
ENTC 4415Project Justification and Management4
ENTC 4446Control Systems I4
Required Mechanical Engineering Technology Courses - CBE
ENTC 3306Fluid Mechanics3
ENTC 3308Strength of Materials3
ENGR 3322Materials Science3
ENTC 3455Solid Modeling and Finite Elements4
ENTC 4320Heat Transfer3
ENTC 4330Solid Mechanics3
ENTC 4360Mechanical System Design3
Chemical Process Industry Elective Block - CBE 1
ENTC 4331Unit Processes3
ENTC 4332Process Modeling and Control3
ENTC 4333Chemical Reaction Engineering3
ENTC 4335Energy Conversion3
On-Campus Block 2
ENTC 3220Thermal-Fluids Laboratory2
ENTC 3302Manufacturing Processes3
ENTC 4210Solid Mechanics Laboratory2
ENTC 4350Capstone Projects3
Total Hours55

Courses

ENTC 2414  Circuit Analysis I  
4 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours, 3 Lab Hours)  

Fundamental aspects of DC circuit analysis: charge, voltage, resistance, current, and power; Ohm's Law; methods of analysis; series and parallel circuits; Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws; Thevenin and Norton Theorems; electrical measurement instruments; and use of analysis software. Offered: Fall/Spring.

Prerequisite: MATH 2413.

Co-requisite: PHYS 2426, SMTE 0099.  
TCCNS: ENGT 1401  
ENTC 2490  Special Topics  
1-4 Semester Credit Hours (1-4 Lecture Hours, 3 Lab Hours)  

Subject material variable. May be repeated for different topics.

ENTC 3220  Thermal-Fluids Laboratory  
2 Semester Credit Hours (4 Lab Hours)  

Application of  measurement instrumentation and experimental techniques utilized in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics.  Experiments and project in hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, and thermodynamics. Offered in Spring.

Prerequisite: (ENTC 3306 and 3320*).
* May be taken concurrently.

Co-requisite: SMTE 0099.  
ENTC 3302  Manufacturing Processes  
3 Semester Credit Hours (2 Lecture Hours, 3 Lab Hours)  

Introduction to metal and non-metallic manufacturing processes; casting, forging, rolling, extrusion, sheet metal forming, cutting tools turning and milling operations, abrasive machining, welding and joining, powder compaction, molding, forming of plastics, surface treatment, human factors and safety. Offered: Fall/Spring.

Prerequisite: (ENGR 1312) and (ENTC 3308) and (ENTC 2326) or (ENGR 2326).

Co-requisite: SMTE 0099.  
ENTC 3306  Fluid Mechanics  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Fluid properties, fluid statics, dynamics, and kinematics, conservation of energy and momentum incompressible, laminar and turbulent flow. Similitude and dimensional analysis, and viscous flow. Offered: Fall (Spring as needed).

Prerequisite: (ENTC 2326 or ENGR 2326).

ENTC 3308  Strength of Materials  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Concepts in strength of materials, stress, strain; torsion; deformation under load; direct, shear, and combined stresses; shear and moment diagrams; Mohr's circle; stress concentrations, bending stresses and torsional shear stresses, deflection in beams and shafts; columns, connections, and pressure vessels. Offered: Fall (Spring as needed).

Prerequisite: (ENTC 2325 or ENGR 2325) and (ENTC 3410).

ENTC 3320  Thermodynamics  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Theory and application of energy methods in engineering; conservation of mass and energy; energy transfer by heat, work and mass; thermodynamic properties; analysis of open and closed systems; the second law of thermodynamics and entropy; gas, vapor and refrigeration cycles. Offered: Fall/Spring.

Prerequisite: PHYS 2425 and MATH 2414.

ENTC 3323  Robotics and Automation  
3 Semester Credit Hours (2 Lecture Hours, 3 Lab Hours)  

Automation in a manufacturing and assembly setting, material handling systems, remote guided vehicles, automated storage and retrieval systems, computer numerical machine tools, robotics. Offered: Spring.

Prerequisite: ENTC 3415.

Co-requisite: SMTE 0099.  
ENTC 3350  Human Factors Engineering  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Application of human factors engineering principles utilized in mechanical system and product design.  Overview of human characteristics and research and design techniques.

Prerequisite: (ENTC 3302 or 3302*).
* May be taken concurrently.

ENTC 3455  Solid Modeling and Finite Elements  
4 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours, 3 Lab Hours)  

Use of computer aided design and solid modeling tools in engineering design and manufacturing including: solid modeling, stress, flow and heat transfer analysis using finite element methods, and rapid prototyping. Offered: Spring.

Prerequisite: ENTC 3308.

ENTC 4210  Solid Mechanics Laboratory  
2 Semester Credit Hours (4 Lab Hours)  

Experimental principles from Strength of Materials, and experiments and computer-based analysis of machine elements and structures for Strength of Material and Solid Mechanics.

Prerequisite: (ENTC 4330*).
* May be taken concurrently.

Co-requisite: SMTE 0099.  
ENTC 4320  Heat Transfer  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Fundamental study of convection, conduction and radiation as applied to heat transfer, heat exchangers, boilers, other heat transfer equipment. Offered: Spring.

Prerequisite: ENTC 3306 and 3320.

ENTC 4322  Programmable Logic Controllers  
3 Semester Credit Hours (2 Lecture Hours, 3 Lab Hours)  

Introduction to PLCs and their use in industrial automation. Topics include programming, counters, timers, interrupts, and process control applications. Offered: As needed.

Prerequisite: ENTC 3416.

Co-requisite: SMTE 0099.  
ENTC 4330  Solid Mechanics  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Stress analysis of deformable bodies and mechanical elements; stress transformation; combined loading; failure modes; material failure theories; fracture and fatigue; deflections and instabilities; thick cylinders; curved beams; design of structural/mechanical members; design processes for shafts, bearings, springs, fasteners, and mechanical joints.

Prerequisite: ENTC 3308.

ENTC 4331  Unit Processes  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Principles and methods for staged separation processes including distillation, absorption and stripping, extraction, and adsorption systems.  Offered in Fall and Spring

Prerequisite: ENTC 4320.

ENTC 4332  Process Modeling and Control  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Process modeling, dynamics, and feedback control. Linear control theory. Application of Laplace transforms and frequency response to the analysis of open-loop and closed-loop process dynamics. Dynamic response characteristics of processes. Stability analysis and gain/phase margins. Design and tuning of systems for control of level, flow, and temperature.  Offered Fall and Spring.

Prerequisite: ENTC 3306.

ENTC 4333  Chemical Reaction Engineering  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Fundamental principles of chemical reaction engineering and application to design and analysis of basic chemical reactors containing both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Offered Fall and Spring.

Prerequisite: ENTC 4331 and 4332.

ENTC 4335  Energy Conversion  
3 Semester Credit Hours (2 Lecture Hours, 3 Lab Hours)  

Installation, design characteristics, operational performance, and maintenance of motors, turbines, pumps and compressors. Introduction to global energy concerns; fossil and nuclear fuels; energy consumption analysis; energy management and conservation techniques; renewable and alternative energy sources. Modern energy conversion devices such as fuel cells, photovoltaic cells, and micro-power turbines.

Prerequisite: ENTC 3320.

ENTC 4350  Capstone Projects  
3 Semester Credit Hours (1 Lecture Hour, 5 Lab Hours)  

This course allows students to employ the knowledge attained in other courses to implement (including building, testing, and documenting) the project approved in ENTC 4415 - Project Justification and Management , within budget and on schedule. Course requirements include a written report and oral presentations. Normally taken in the student's last semester.

Prerequisite: ENTC 4415.

Co-requisite: SMTE 0099.  
ENTC 4360  Mechanical System Design  
3 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours)  

Analysis, management and cost, team work, optimal design, and computer simulation of mechanical systems and components; Applications in fluid flow and heat transfer, machine elements, and stress analysis. Selected course topics are assigned as projects.

Prerequisite: ENTC 4330.

ENTC 4415  Project Justification and Management  
4 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours, 2 Lab Hours)  

Foundations of engineering economy, cash flow and equivalence, and project justification. Introduction to project management, planning, scheduling, and control, use of project management software, GANTT charts, PERT charts, critical path. Students prepare proposals, including specifications, timelines, schedule, and budget, for projects to be implemented in ENTC 4350 - Capstone Projects .

Co-requisite: SMTE 0099.  
ENTC 4446  Control Systems I  
4 Semester Credit Hours (3 Lecture Hours, 3 Lab Hours)  

Introduction to control systems; open and feedback; Laplace transform and frequency response; control valves; electric motors; P, PI, and PID modes of control; analog and digital controllers Process characteristics; analysis of control systems; gain and phase margin; stability.

Prerequisite: ENTC 2414.

ENTC 4490  Selected Topics  
1-4 Semester Credit Hours (1-4 Lecture Hours)  

Subject material variable. May be repeated for different topics.

ENTC 4496  Directed Independent Study  
1-4 Semester Credit Hours  

Requires a formal proposal of study to be completed in advance of registration, approval of supervising faculty and chairperson.