Sep 20, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Psychology

  
  •  

    PSYC 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1‑3 sem. hrs. See College description. Offered by application.
  
  •  

    PSYC 4398 - Applied Experience

    3 sem. hrs. See College description. Offered by application.

Reading Education

  
  •  

    READ 0399 - Basic Reading and Comprehension

    3 sem. hrs. This is a reading course for students who need assistance in developing college level reading skills. Emphasis will be on improving reading comprehension, critical reasoning skills, recognition of the organization of ideas in written material, study skills and vocabulary development. The Higher Education Assessment (THEA) reading skills will be covered. Required for THEA liable undergraduate students. (Not counted toward graduation.) Course fee required.
  
  •  

    READ 3310 - Principles and Practices of Early Reading Instruction

    3 sem. hrs. This course explores theories of early language and literacy development of children. Course content addresses language development and literacy concepts essential for pre-reading areas, such as phonemic awareness, oral language development, listening comprehension development, and alphabetic knowledge. The course explores ways educators can enhance language and literacy concepts utilizing art, music, and drama. READ 3310 emphasizes development of emergent literacy skills that lead to literacy skills taught in  .
  
  •  

    READ 3320 - Principles and Practices of Reading Instruction

    3 sem. hrs. The purpose of this course is to provide the preservice teacher with a solid foundation for effective literacy instruction.  This course will review research-based teaching strategies, instructional materials for phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension will as methods and assessments for efficacious literacy instruction.  The primary focus of course content will be on core (tier 1) classroom instruction with discussions of differentiated instruction and frameworks for responsive intervention also addressed.  The targeted grade levels for this course are third through sixth grade.
  
  •  

    READ 3321 - Principles and Practices of Reading Instruction, Grades 4 – 8

    3 sem. hrs. This course will emphasize materials, methods, and beliefs for teaching reading in grades 4-8. Components of the course will include but not be limited to the five pillars of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000): phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.
  
  •  

    READ 3351 - Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Problems

    3 sem. hrs. Diagnosis and correction of reading problems are examined in detail. Emphasis is upon the precise administration, scoring, and interpretation of various diagnostic instruments used to detect reading problems. The correction processes for identified problems are also examined. Components of the course will include but not be limited to the five pillars of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000): phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Prerequisite: READ 3310 & READ 3320, or READ 3353
  
  •  

    READ 3352 - Content Area Reading for Elementary Students

    3 sem. hrs. This course focuses on recent issues, materials, methods, and strategies considerred essential for effective reading instruction in the elementary school content areas.  Components of the course will include comprehension strategies, vocabulary development, reading-writing connections, and word study. The course will also include but not be limited to the five pillars of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000): phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Prerequisite: READ 3310  and READ 3320 .
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $50
  
  •  

    READ 3353 - Content Area Reading for Secondary Students

    3 sem. hrs. The skills required of secondary students to deal with subject matter in the various content areas are presented. In addition, developmental and corrective processes that incorporate the identification and remediation of dyslexia and other reading disorders are presented.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $50
  
  •  

    READ 3355 - Teaching Reading in the Secondary School

    3 sem. hrs. This course focuses on planning, developing, selecting, and organizing reading materials for secondary reading instruction. Prerequisite: READ 3353.
  
  •  

    READ 3356 - Technology and Literacy

    3 sem. hrs. Various software packages that have been developed for providing initial and tutorial instruction in the language arts are presented. In addition, instructional techniques for using these packages are covered. Prerequisites: READ 3320 and READ 3321.
  
  •  

    READ 4352 - Advanced Practices in Reading/ Language Arts

    3 sem. hrs. The emphasis is on instructional approaches supported by current theory and research and supervised implementation in a school setting. Attention is given to word study, comprehension, critical reading and reasoning, and reading-writing connections. Components of the course will include but not be limited to the five pillars of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000): phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Prerequisites: READ 3320, READ 3351, and READ 4380. This course must be taken concurrently with READ 4394.
  
  •  

    READ 4380 - Children’s and Adolescents’ Literature

    3 sem. hrs. Provides students with an understanding of children’s and adolescent literature. Included in the class is the reading and study of literature and how to promote reading of literature in the schools. Extensive reading is required.
  
  •  

    READ 4394 - Field Experiences in Reading

    3 sem. hrs. The culminating experience for those students working toward a specialization in reading. Students are provided supervised experience in field-based activities, in addition to on‑campus activities. Prerequisites: READ 3310 , READ 3320 , READ 3351 , READ 3352 , and READ 4380 .
  
  •  

    READ 4696 - Directed Individual Study

    1‑6 sem. hrs. Programs will be designed for individual cases through special permission of the Department Chair and Dean. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

Religious Studies

  
  •  

    RELS 3301 - History of World Religions

    3 sem. hrs. Survey of the key beliefs, practices, rituals, figures, and historical developments of the world’s major religious traditions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and New Age religions. Gives particular attention to their encounter with modernity and their complicated place in today’s global, diverse, post-modern world.
  
  •  

    RELS 4390 - Topics in Religious Studies

    3 sem. hrs. Study of significant traditions, themes, problems, or issues in religion.  May be repeated when topics vary.
  
  •  

    RELS 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1-3 sem. hrs. See College description. Offered on application. Subject to approval of Religious Studies program coordinator.

Science, Mathematics and Technology Education

  
  •  

    SMTE 0091 - Biological Laboratory Safety Seminar

    0 sem. hrs. This non-credit course is designed as an on-line offering that must be passed by students each semester and at a grade of 100%. Students will be responsible for taking safety courses with different course numbers of SMTE, as each lab must meet different safety requirements as specified by the A&M System, depending on the types of hazardous materials used in each lab. Students will not be charged a fee for taking these courses.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
  •  

    SMTE 0092 - Biomedical Laboratory Safety Seminar

    0 sem. hrs. This non-credit course is designed as an on-line offering that must be passed by students each semester and at a grade of 100%. Students will be responsible for taking safety courses with different course numbers of SMTE, as each lab must meet different safety requirements as specified by the A&M System, depending on the types of hazardous materials used in each lab. Students will not be charged a fee for taking these courses.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
  •  

    SMTE 0093 - Chemistry Laboratory Safety Seminar

    0 sem. hrs. This non-credit course is designed as an on-line offering that must be passed by students each semester and at a grade of 100%. Students will be responsible for taking safety courses with different course numbers of SMTE, as each lab must meet different safety requirements as specified by the A&M System, depending on the types of hazardous materials used in each lab. Students will not be charged a fee for taking these courses.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
  •  

    SMTE 0094 - Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar

    0 sem. hrs. This non-credit course is designed as an on-line offering that must be passed by students each semester and at a grade of 100%. Students will be responsible for taking safety courses with different course numbers of SMTE, as each lab must meet different safety requirements as specified by the A&M System, depending on the types of hazardous materials used in each lab. Students will not be charged a fee for taking these courses.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
  •  

    SMTE 0095 - Physics Laboratory Safety Seminar

    0 sem. hrs. This non-credit course is designed as an on-line offering that must be passed by students each semester and at a grade of 100%. Students will be responsible for taking safety courses with different course numbers of SMTE, as each lab must meet different safety requirements as specified by the A&M System, depending on the types of hazardous materials used in each lab. Students will not be charged a fee for taking these courses.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
  •  

    SMTE 0096 - Environmental Science Laboratory Safety Seminar

    0 sem. hrs. This non-credit course is designed as an on-line offering that must be passed by students each semester and at a grade of 100%. Students will be responsible for taking safety courses with different course numbers of SMTE, as each lab must meet different safety requirements as specified by the A&M System, depending on the types of hazardous materials used in each lab. Students will not be charged a fee for taking these courses.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
  •  

    SMTE 0097 - Art Student Safety Seminar

    0 sem. hrs. This non-credit course is designed as an on-line offering that must be passed by students each semester and at a grade of 100%. Students will be responsible for taking safety courses with different course numbers of SMTE, as each lab must meet different safety requirements as specified by the A&M System, depending on the types of hazardous materials used in each lab. Students will not be charged a fee for taking these courses.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
  •  

    SMTE 0098 - Theatre Student Safety Seminar

    0 sem. hrs. This non-credit course is designed as an on-line offering that must be passed by students each semester and at a grade of 100%. Students will be responsible for taking safety courses with different course numbers of SMTE, as each lab must meet different safety requirements as specified by the A&M System, depending on the types of hazardous materials used in each lab. Students will not be charged a fee for taking these courses.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
  •  

    SMTE 1350 - Fundamentals of Mathematics I

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) The conceptual framework for understanding and applying properties, models, and operations related to various number systems in problem solving settings. Prerequisite: MATH 1314. Fall, Spring, Summer. TCCNS Equivalent: MATH 1350
  
  •  

    SMTE 1351 - Fundamentals of Mathematics II

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) The conceptual framework for understanding and applying properties, models, and operations related to various data systems in problem solving settings. Prerequisite: SMTE 1350  and TSIA-Math/ACT/SAT score required for teacher certification. See math.tamucc.edu/placement.html for scores. Fall, Spring, Summer. TCCNS Equivalent: MATH 1351
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $75
  
  •  

    SMTE 3315 - Foundational Approaches to the Physical Sciences

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) Physical science topics such as simple machines, atoms, molecules, electricity and magnetism, sound, and light. Laboratory involvement will emphasize techniques of problem solving, data gathering, and data application. The course is taught following an inquiry based format and is recommended for future K-8 level science educators. Corequisite:  SMTE 0096 - Environmental Science Laboratory Safety Seminar  - Required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Offered fall, spring and summer semesters every year.

  
  •  

    SMTE 3316 - Foundational Approaches to the Life Sciences

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) Emphasis on biological concepts including cells, plants, invertebrate and vertebrate structural systems. Laboratory investigations focus on techniques of problem solving, data gathering, and data applications. The course is taught following an inquiry based format and is recommended for future K-8 level science educators. Corequisite: Safety training given in  SMTE 0091 - Biological Laboratory Safety Seminar  is required for continued participation in this course. 
    Offered fall, spring and summer semesters every year.

  
  •  

    SMTE 3352 - Fundamentals of Mathematics III

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) The conceptual framework for understanding and applying properties, models, and operations related to various geometric systems in problem solving settings. Prerequisite: SMTE 1351  and TSIA-Math/ACT/SAT score required for teacher certification. See math.tamucc.edu/placement.html for scores. Fall, Spring, Summer.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $75
  
  •  

    SMTE 4217 - Secondary Approaches to the Life Sciences

    2 sem. hrs. (2:0) Study of secondary science teaching and learning from the standpoints of theory and practice, curriculum objectives, materials and evaluation. The course will emphasize contemporary issues by focusing on biological content ranging across the sub-disciplines of molecular biology, physiology, evolution and environmental science while teaching in a relevant and engaging context that includes web searches, laboratory activities, and student-centered inquiry activities
    Offered fall semester every year.

  
  •  

    SMTE 4270 - Science Education Topics I

    2 sem. hrs. (2:0) Presentation of the conceptual framework for understanding and applying science content in life sciences including biology, ecology and evolution using the national standards for science education and Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). The course is taught using scientifically researched literature and content knowledge in an inquiry based format and is recommended for future 4-8 and 7-12 level science educators.
    Offered spring semester every year.

  
  •  

    SMTE 4273 - Historical Development of the Sciences

    2 sem. hrs. (2:0) Study of human endeavors leading to the present body of scientific knowledge placed in a historical and philosophical context. Portions of the materials will be presented in a format conducive to adaptation for middle school and high school. Prerequisites: BIOL 1407 - Biology II , CHEM 1412 - General Chemistry II , EDUC 3311 - School and Society  or approval of instructor.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
  •  

    SMTE 4320 - Secondary Science Laboratory Techniques

    3 sem. hrs. (2:3) This course is designed to assist the 4-8 and 7-12 future science teacher in developing content knowledge, skills and mastery of designated laboratory and research techniques through scientific experimentation in areas such as chemistry, biology and physics. State and national laboratory safety mandates will also be addressed. Prerequisites: BIOL 1407 - Biology II , CHEM 1412 - General Chemistry II , EDUC 3311 - School and Society  or approval of instructor.  Corequisite: Safety training given in  SMTE 0091 - Biological Laboratory Safety Seminar  is required for continued participation in this course. 
    Offered fall semester every year.

  
  •  

    SMTE 4370 - Mathematics Education Topics I

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Presentations of contemporary issues in mathematics education. Topics include history of mathematics education, state and national standards for mathematics education, cognitive development, the importance of culture, language and gender in learning mathematics, authentic assessment, and interdisciplinary curriculum.
  
  •  

    SMTE 4382 - Basic Mathematics From An Advanced Viewpoint

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Capstone course for students pursuing grades 4-8 certification in mathematics. Presents basic mathematical concepts in the context of advanced mathematics courses. The course includes historical development of significant ideas in mathematics and science, interpretations of mathematical topics at multiple levels, and the use of technology to generate and convey understanding of mathematical ideas. Prerequisites: MATH 2305, MATH 3312, and completion of at least 90 hours.
  
  •  

    SMTE 4490 - Selected Topics

    1-4 sem. hrs. Subject materials variable. May be repeated for credit when topics are significantly different. Faculty approval required.
    May be offered any semester: students should consult the online course schedule.

  
  •  

    SMTE 4496 - Directed Independent Study

    1-4 sem. hrs. Requires a formal proposal of study to be completed in advance of registration and to be approved by the supervising faculty, the Chairperson, and the Dean of the College.
    Offered any semester upon request by a student and consent of the instructor.


Sociology

  
  •  

    SOCI 1301 - Human Societies

    3 sem. hrs. An introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and theories used in Sociology. Topics illuminate the relationship between technology and social change. Reciprocal relationships between individuals and society are examined. Topics may include – but are not limited to – culture, deviance, globalization, social stratification, race and ethnicity, gender.
    This course satisfies the University core requirement in social science.

  
  •  

    SOCI 2319 - Social Psychology

    3 sem. hrs. The scientific study of how a person’s thoughts and behavior are influenced by others. Topics will include social cognition, attitudes, persuasion, interpersonal relationships, and group behavior. (Credit may not be given for both this course and PSYC 2326.) TCCNS Equivalent: SOCI 2326/PSYC 2319
  
  •  

    SOCI 3301 - Cultural Anthropology

    3 sem. hrs. Study of the social life of human groups from their earliest appearance to the present. Analyses of cultures include language, kinship, art, religion, economics, and political behavior. Cross-cultural comparisons allow development of generalizations about social patterns, social structure, and cultural practices found in human societies. (Credit may not be given for both this course and ANTH 3301.)
  
  •  

    SOCI 3310 - Sociology through Film

    3 sem. hrs. lecture The examination of film as a culture artifact to illustrate sociological concepts, theories, and perspectives. Specific attention will be given to narratives of film as they illustrate culture, aging, social class, gender, race/ethnicity, identity, and other sociological concepts.
  
  •  

    SOCI 3312 - Racial and Ethnic Relations

    3 sem. hrs. The study of cultural, religious, ethnic and racial groups, and the treatment accorded them in society. Prejudice, discrimination and the outcomes of discrimination in relation to both dominant and subordinate groups are considered.
  
  •  

    SOCI 3315 - Population

    3 sem. hrs. A study of population growth, distribution and change, and the reasons for these patterns. Also an examination of population-related problems and policies. (Offered Spring only.)
  
  •  

    SOCI 3320 - Sociology of Gender

    3 sem. hrs. An examination of the roots, nature and social construction of gender roles including socialization of men and women, gender role relationships from the perspectives of sociology. Issues of family, education, work and the economy, religion, politics and law, feminist organizations, feminist theory, and men’s and women’s movements will be considered.
  
  •  

    SOCI 3321 - Mexican American Women

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the Chicanas and the trends in society and Mexican-American culture affecting their lives and behaviors.
  
  •  

    SOCI 3340 - Sociology of the Family

    3 sem. hrs. The study of the family, relationships among its members, and the relationship of family to other social institutions.
  
  •  

    SOCI 3349 - Sociology of Deviant Behavior

    3 sem. hrs. A systematic and critical study of the nature, patterns, and processes of violations of significant social norms by members of society. Specific attention is given to violations such as drug abuse, violence in and outside the family, and white-collar offenses.
  
  •  

    SOCI 3350 - Sociology of Education

    3 sem. hrs. Employing a sociological lens to examine formal education in the United States and other countries, students will explore various schools of thought and controversies surrounding education in modern societies. They will examine important issues related to formal education, such as the expansion of schooling, equality of educational opportunity, unequal achievement of groups of students, the reproduction of inequality in education, schools’ roles in the transmission of culture, and the social organization of schools.
  
  •  

    SOCI 3370 - Native Americans in North America

    3 sem. hrs. An ethnographic and historical analysis of Native American cultures in what is now called North America from prehistoric times to the present. (Credit may not be given for both this course and ANTH 3370.)
  
  •  

    SOCI 4301 - Social Theory

    3 sem. hrs. Combines an analysis of the major ideas and theories in sociology and their relationship to social research with an understanding of social processes and structures. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or permission of instructor. (Required for Majors.) Offered Fall semesters only.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4310 - Sociology of Work and Occupations

    3 sem. hrs. The study of work as a social phenomenon, including the social organization of work, occupations, and professions in society. The labor force, work culture, workers mobility, career lines, and leisure in contrast to work are considered.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4312 - Social Class and Inequality

    3 sem. hrs. The study of social inequality in society, with emphasis on the social class structure of the United States, its origins, development, and consequences for individuals, groups, and society. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301  and SOCI 3312  or permission of instructor.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $50
  
  •  

    SOCI 4315 - Complex Organizations

    3 sem. hrs. The development of a theoretical and applied understanding of those social institutions where most of us will be employed. Topics include organizational effectiveness, decision making, designs, politics, cultures, as well as gender and racial inequality.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4318 - Social Change and Modernization

    3 sem. hrs. A study of how technology, culture, social movements, etc. affect large-scale change in societies.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4320 - Sociology of Sports

    3 sem. hrs. This course critically examines the relationships between organized sports and the rest of society. It will undertake a sociological analysis of how organized sports affect, and are affected by, major social institutions such as the economy, racial and gender relations, mass media, and religion, to mention but a few.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4325 - Medical Sociology

    3 sem. hrs. Examination of the social contexts of physical and mental health, illness and medical care. Topics include the social, environmental, and occupational factors in health and disease; socialization of health care providers; doctor-patient relationships; the structure and processes of health care organizations; and health care and social change.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4326 - Food and Society

    3 sem. hrs. lecture The study of the social and cultural dimensions of the human food system, from production to consumption. The course proposes that food systems and food consumption patterns are products of the interplay of social forces of innovation and change with counter forces of continuity and stability. The main areas covered include the origins of human subsistence, the development of the modern food system, food and the family, eating out, diet and health, diet and body image, food risks, the meanings of meat, and vegetarianism.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4331 - Juvenile Delinquency

    3 sem. hrs. Examination of the extent and pattern of juvenile crime today. History and theory of delinquency and society’s response to it. (Credit may not be given for both this course and CRIJ 4331.)
  
  •  

    SOCI 4335 - Criminology

    3 sem. hrs. An examination of the major sociological explanations for crime, criminal behavior, and the social responses to crime. (Credit may not be given for both this course and CRIJ 4335.)
  
  •  

    SOCI 4365 - Coming of Age: Sociology of Youth through Early Adulthood

    3 sem. hrs. lecture The study of aging and the life course from childhood through early adulthood.  Focus is on the major theories of aging over the life course. Specific attention is given to the social construction of age and aging, socialization over the life course, and the extent to which the life course is influenced by race, class, and gender. Also considered are life course perspectives of family, education, work, leisure, health, and/or deviance.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4375 - Graying in America: Sociology of Retirement

    3 sem. hrs. This course critically examines the social context within which retirement behavior occurs in the United States. Topics will include sociological theories related to aging, factors influencing retirement, including race, class, and gender, as well as debates surrounding Social Security policy.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4385 - Senior Seminar in Sociology

    3 sem. hrs. This is a capstone course required of all students graduating with a major in sociology. The course is designed to enable faculty to assess each student’s expertise in applying sociological concepts and practices. Students demonstrate this expertise through the completion of a final project that combines a minimum of classroom hours with substantial research activity. The course is team taught by the entire sociology faculty. Students are allowed considerable flexibility in selecting either survey research or evaluation research for their project.(Offered Spring Only.)
  
  •  

    SOCI 4390 - Topics in Sociology

    3 sem. hrs. A consideration of various topics on social behavior and social structure. May be repeated when topics vary.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1‑3 sem. hrs. See College description. Offered on application.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4398 - Applied Experience

    3 sem. hrs. See College description. Offered on application.
  
  •  

    SOCI 4445 - Social Research Methods

    4 sem. hrs. A survey of the basic research techniques and methods used in sociology including content analysis, field research, sampling, surveys, polls, and computerized data analysis. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or permission of instructor. (Offered Fall Only.)

Social Work

  
  •  

    SOCW 3301 - Introduction to Social Work

    3 sem. hrs. An introductory survey of the field of social work including the nature, function, and types of social work practice. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the history, terminology, scope, and values of the profession of social work. Prerequisite: PSYC 2301 or SOCI 1301 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOCW 3310 - Approaches to Social Welfare

    3 sem. hrs. Origin, development, and present status of social service programs with particular emphasis on the relationship of program resources, human needs, and the methods through which services are provided.
  
  •  

    SOCW 3320 - Social Services in the Community

    3 sem. hrs. An introduction to the organizations and agencies involved in social service delivery. Exploration of the range and characteristics of the human service delivery system with particular emphasis on the social work profession. Prerequisite: SOCW 3310 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOCW 3350 - Social Work Practice

    3 sem. hrs. Social Work practice from a generalist perspective of social work intervention. Data collection, assessment, intervention, planning/implementation, and evaluation are covered. Prerequisite: SOCW 3301 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOCW 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1-3 sem. hrs. See College description. Offered on application. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOCW 4398 - Applied Experience

    3 sem. hrs. One semester course of field work in a selected agency. (See college description. Offered on application.) Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Spanish

  
  •  

    SPAN 1311 - Spanish I

    3 sem. hrs. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing skills within a Spanish cultural framework. For students without previous knowledge of the language. (Language laboratory required. One hour per week.) *A lab fee is required for these courses. TCCNS Equivalent: SPAN 1311
  
  •  

    SPAN 1312 - Spanish II

    3 sem. hrs. Continued practice in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills within a Spanish cultural framework. (Language laboratory required. One hour per week.) A lab fee is required for these courses. Spanish 1311 or equivalent required. TCCNS Equivalent: SPAN 1312
  
  •  

    SPAN 2311 - Spanish III

    3 sem. hrs. Study of more complex Spanish sentence structure to further listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at an intermediate level within a Spanish cultural framework. Prerequisite: SPAN 1312 , three years of high school Spanish, or equivalent. TCCNS Equivalent: SPAN 2311
  
  •  

    SPAN 2312 - Continuing Spanish

    3 sem. hrs. Continued development and review of all language skills at an intermediate level within a Spanish framework with an emphasis in the linguistic and cultural perspective. Prerequisite: SPAN 2311 ,  four years of high school Spanish, or equivalent. TCCNS Equivalent: SPAN 2312
  
  •  

    SPAN 2313 - Spanish for Heritage Speakers

    3 sem. hrs. An introductory course designed for bilingual students who wish to enhance their linguistic skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing). This course will focus on the cultural and historical aspects related to the heritage Spanish speaker. TCCNS Equivalent: SPAN 2313
  
  •  

    SPAN 2316 - Spanish for the Professions

    3 sem. hrs. The course stresses Health, Business and Legal terminology in Spanish and English as well as typical interactions with native speakers in those environments. Prerequisite: SPAN 2312 , equivalent, or faculty approval.
  
  •  

    SPAN 3302 - Spanish Composition

    3 sem. hrs. A course designed to develop analytical perspectives in literary criticism and to strengthen reading and writing skills in Spanish through intensive reading of Spanish, Spanish American, and Chicano fiction. Prerequisite: SPAN 2312 , equivalent, or faculty approval.
  
  •  

    SPAN 3303 - Spanish Conversation

    3 sem. hrs. A course designed to strengthen the student’s oral proficiency in the language through selected readings, videos and oral presentations. Prerequisite: SPAN 2312 , equivalent, or faculty approval.
  
  •  

    SPAN 3304 - Spanish Civilization

    3 sem. hrs. This course has been designed to provide a general overview of the historical, sociocultural and political experience of the Spanish people. Prerequisite: SPAN 2312 , equivalent, or faculty approval.
  
  •  

    SPAN 3305 - Spanish American Civilization

    3 sem. hrs. This course has been designed to provide a general overview of the historical, sociocultural and political experience of the American people before and after Columbus. Prerequisite: SPAN 2312 , equivalent, or faculty approval.
  
  •  

    SPAN 3307 - Spanish Literature I

    3 sem. hrs. A critical approach to the study of early Spanish literature from the Middle Ages through the Eighteenth Century. Literary selections include masterpieces that establish and reflect Spain’s literary tradition within its larger European context.
    This course may be used to satisfy the university core curriculum requirement in literature.Conducted in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 3308 - Spanish Literature II

    3 sem. hrs. A continuation of a critical approach to the study of Spanish literature from the Nineteenth Century through the present. Representative works of Spanish Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, and contemporary literature are studied within their larger European context.
    This course may be used to satisfy the university core curriculum requirement in literature.Conducted in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 3309 - Spanish American Literature I

    3 sem. hrs. A critical approach to the study of early Spanish American literature from the Pre-Columbian Period through the Nineteenth Century. Selected readings in all literary genres, major themes, writers, and early literary movements will be studied within their larger Latin American context.
    This course may be used to satisfy the university core curriculum requirement in literature.Conducted in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 3310 - Spanish American Literature II

    3 sem. hrs. A continuation of a critical approach to the study of Spanish American literature from the Twentieth Century through the present. Representative works of Latin American writers and literary movements: Modernism, Realism, Avant-Garde, Regionalism, Magic-Realism are studied within their larger Latin American context.
    This course may be used to satisfy the university core curriculum requirement in literature.Conducted in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 3311 - Spanish Phonetics

    3 sem. hrs. A course designed to study the production and discrimination of the Spanish sound system with a general overview of the geographical and social distribution of phonemic and allophonic variants.
  
  •  

    SPAN 3312 - Spanish Grammar

    3 sem. hrs. A course designed for Spanish majors to study language structures. Major emphasis will be given to Morphology and Syntax and their role in both oral and written expressions.
  
  •  

    SPAN 3313 - Spanish Translation

    3 sem. hrs. This course is an introduction to literary and professional Spanish translation, including theories of translation, methodologies to limit translation loss, and lexical differences between Spanish and English.
  
  •  

    SPAN 3315 - Civilizations of the Spanish-Speaking World

    3 sem. hrs. This course has been designed to provide a general overview of the historical, sociocultural and political experience of peoples from the Spanish-Speaking world, both from Spain and Spanish America. Prerequisite: SPAN 2312 , equivalent, or faculty approval.
  
  •  

    SPAN 3317 - Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

    3 sem. hrs. This course introduces the study of language, the main subfields of Hispanic linguistics, and their application to other sciences.  Advanced proficiency in Spanish required.
  
  •  

    SPAN 4301 - Spanish Civil War and Literature

    3 sem. hrs. Significance of the Civil War for Spanish, European, and world history. Effect of war on literary and cultural life of the country and the response of writers from Spain and Latin America. Conducted in Spanish.
    Conducted in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 4302 - Mexican Narrative

    3 sem. hrs. Examination of representative novels and short stories reflecting the emergence of a post-revolutionary society in Mexico. Conducted in Spanish.
  
  •  

    SPAN 4303 - Spanish in the Southwest

    3 sem. hrs. Cultural and linguistic dimensions of Spanish dialects of the Southwestern United States, with special attention to Texas Spanish and its sociolinguistic perspectives in the bilingual community at large. Prerequisites: SPAN 2312 or equivalent.
  
  •  

    SPAN 4304 - Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quijote

    3 sem. hrs. An advanced course designed to provide an introduction to Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quijote.
  
  •  

    SPAN 4305 - Latin American Novel

    3 sem. hrs. This course explores major novels from Latin America from the 20th century to the present.  It examines the different problems, discourses, voices, contexts, and geographies that define this genre in Latin America.
  
  •  

    SPAN 4313 - Spanish Interpretation

    3 sem. hrs. This course presents an introduction to methodologies, requirements, terminology, and practice of interpretation, with emphasis on simultaneous, consecutive, and sight interpretation.
  
  •  

    SPAN 4320 - Spanish in the Americas

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the Spanish that was brought to the Americas, its development, propagation and contact with native-American languages, including the sociocultural factors that have contributed to the linguistic variation in contemporary Spanish-speaking societies.
 

Page: 1 <- Back 105 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15