Oct 21, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECED 4330 - Health, Nutrition and Locomotor Concepts for the Young Child

    3 sem. hrs. The relationship between health, nutrition, and locomotor development in the young child is investigated.
  
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    ECED 4340 - Communication and Aesthetics

    3 sem. hrs. A study of language development; early literacy, language arts, and aesthetics. Students will develop an integrated thematic unit plan. Strategies and curriculum materials that are developmentally appropriate for young children will be emphasized to support the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of ECED 3311 and ECED 3324.
  
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    ECED 4345 - EC-6 Assessment and Evaluation

    3 sem. hrs. A study of assessment for children EC-6 utilizing both formal and informal instruments will be addressed. A knowledge of choosing, administering, and reporting developmental assessment will be explored with an emphasis on assessment tools that can be used by teachers of young children. Principles of designing and using assessment and evaluation techniques that are culturally fair, intellectually sound, reliable, and content-valid for young children. Differentiation among criterion-referenced, norm-referenced, individual, informal, authentic, and group assessments will be emphasized. Students will review strategies for using assessment data to design instruction, and match assessment techniques to individual children and learning situations
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $50
  
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    ECED 4350 - EC-6 Social Studies Curriculum

    3 sem. hrs. This course will expose students to skills and concepts taught in the Social Studies curriculum in the elementary school. Developmentally appropriate strategies, concepts, and curricular materials used in teaching the Social Studies will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Completion of ECED 3324 , EDCI 3311 (or EDCI 5305 for MAC students) with the grade of “C” or better and completion or concurrent enrollment in ECED 3380 .

Economics

  
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    ECON 1301 - Introduction to Economics

    Non-technical introduction to the structure and functioning of the aggregate economy and selected specific markets.  Basic concepts regarding how markets function, regulation,  monetary and fiscal policy in a macroeconomic context and some special topics of contemporary relevance are studied.  Students are introduced to the basic concepts used in the social and behavioral sciences for measuring and interpreting economic and business conditions. This course cannot be taken to fulfill the Business Core or any Business Major requirements. It is recommended that students who might be interested in majoring in business or economics, take either ECON 2301 or ECON 2302 instead.


  
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    ECON 2301 - Macroeconomics Principles

    3 sem. hrs. An overview of how the economy of the United States is organized and functions in a market price system. Market processes are used to show how resources and incomes are allocated by households and businesses. Determination of national income, employment, price level, interest rates, and growth are the focus of simple analysis techniques. Monetary and fiscal policies are examined including their international dimensions. Satisfies the social and behavioral sciences component of the University core curriculum. A student taking remedial courses in Basic English (ENGL 0399 ) and/or Mathematics (MATH 0300 ) is not recommended to take this course concurrently. TCCNS Equivalent: ECON 2301
    Satisfies the economics component of the University core curriculum.

    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $75
  
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    ECON 2302 - Microeconomics Principles

    3 sem. hrs. Demand and supply, consumer behavior, elasticity, production costs, perfect and imperfect market structures and models of the modern market price system are analyzed. Emphasis is on use of marginal analysis to determine prices, output, income and economic welfare in a market price system. Satisfies the social and behaviorial sciences component of the university core curriculum. A student taking remedial courses in Basic English (ENGL 0399 ) and/or Mathematics (MATH 0300 ) is not recommended to take this course concurrently. TCCNS Equivalent: ECON 2302
    Satisfies the economics component of the University core curriculum.

    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
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    ECON 2302.H01 - Microeconomics Principles

    3 sem. hrs. Demand and supply, consumer behavior, elasticity, production costs, perfect and imperfect market structures and models of the modern market price system are analyzed. Emphasis is on use of marginal analysis to determine prices, output, income and economic welfare in a market price system. Satisfies the social and behaviorial sciences component of the university core curriculum. Prerequisite: A student taking remedial courses in Basic English (ENGL 0399 ) and/or Mathematics (MATH 0300 ) is not recommended to take this course concurrently.  TCCNS Equivalent: ECON 2301
  
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    ECON 3310 - Intermediate Macroeconomics

    3 sem. hrs. Theory of the determination of aggregate income, employment and prices is examined. Focus is on the microeconomic foundations of aggregate demand: consumption, investment, foreign trade, and government. Macroeconomic models from the basic through the complete model are examined for the U.S. and global economies. Prerequisites: ECON 2301, ECON 2302, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 3311 - Intermediate Microeconomics

    3 sem. hrs. Examines supply and demand analysis, consumption theory, production theory, structure and performance of firms, efficiency of markets, and determination of general welfare in a market price system. Prerequisites: ECON 2301, ECON 2302, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 3312 - Money and Banking

    3 sem. hrs. Description of the operations of banking and other financial institutions, examination of the basic tenets of monetary theory, analysis of monetary policy and its contribution to economic policy. Prerequisites: ECON 2301, ECON 2302 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 3315 - International Economic Issues

    3 sem. hrs. Evaluates and analyzes various contemporary issues in international economics, using elementary economic theory and recent economic and financial data. The course includes issues such as economic integration, regionalization and globalization, international trade issues, the structure and role of international economic organizations, the foreign exchange market, and economic issues in developing countries. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 3316 - Environmental Economics

    3 sem. hrs. Uses economic analysis to examine the underlying causes of environmental and natural resource problems, as well as alternative policy issues. The choice of environmental protection goals and the means of achieving them are analyzed and applied to the cases of air pollution (local and global), water pollution, and toxic pollution. The environmental policies of various countries are compared and studied from an economic perspective. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 or ECON 2302, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 3320 - Public Finance

    3 sem. hrs. This course examines the role that government plays in the economy. The course discusses the conditions for economic efficiency to be achieved and circumstances where a market fails. It also presents the concepts of public goods and the aggregation of individual preferences into collective priorities as expressed by the general public through the political process. Topics include taxation, welfare economics, environmental and health externalities, cost-benefit analysis, and government budget. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 , or ECON 2302 , and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 3322 - Managerial Economics

    3 sem. hrs. Emphasis is on the use of economic principles to make sound business decisions. Students will use economic analysis, knowledge of markets and organizations to address real-world problems. The course emphasizes the role of the business economist as a member of the management team trying to find ways to improve the use of resources available to an organization. Prerequisites: ECON 2302, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 3335 - Labor Economics

    3 sem. hrs. The study of labor theory and labor market processes to explain how household labor decisions are made and how household incomes are determined. The effects of labor market imperfections, and the effects of business decisions and labor unions on labor market outcomes are also evaluated. Provides an overview of the U.S. labor movement, including its impact on federal legislation; labor theory; and contemporary labor issues. The effects of federal legislation are examined, including those on the competitiveness of U.S. labor in a global economy. Prerequisites: ECON 2301, ECON 2302, AND Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 4085 - Economics Exit Exam

    0 sem. hrs. 0:0 The Economics Exit Exam (EEE) is an exam given in the Fall and Spring semesters only. It is a graduation requirement for all students with a BBA degree in Economics. Students enroll in this course during the semester that they plan to take the EEE. Admission is limited to students who have completed 90 or more semester credit hours.
  
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    ECON 4310 - Introduction to Econometrics

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the analysis of quantitative data, with special emphasis on the application of statistical methods to economic problems. The course covers the theory and practice of ordinary least squares regression, application to economics and finance, and selected special topics. Topics include heteroskedasticity, multicollinearity and autocorrelation, qualitative independent and dependent variables, and simple time-series analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 , ECON 2302 , ORMS 3310  (or MATH 1324  or equivalent) and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 4325 - Economics of European Integration

    3 sem. hrs. An introduction to the economics of Western Europe, and by implication, the economic functions of the institutions of the European Union (EU). Students are introduced to economic policy issues which are currently of concern in the European Union, and the analysis of economic problems which are of particular relevance to European Union member states. These include (but are not limited to) the theory of customs unions, optimal currency area theory, the single market, competition policy, and the external trade and development policies of the EU. Prerequisites: ECON 2301, ECON 2302, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 4388 - History of Economic Thought

    3 sem. hrs. A consideration of the philosophical basis, historical context, and development of economic thinking. Focuses on pre-20th-century economists-the Mercantilists, the Physiocrats, Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Karl Marx, and early neoclassical economists. Attention is also given to later economists and schools of thought as continuations and modifications of earlier ideas in economics. Prerequisites: ECON 3310, ECON 3311 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ECON 4390 - Current Topics in Economics

    1-3 sem. hrs. Selected topics for special study related to economics, the functioning of the economy or economic issues. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 or equivalent, and others depending on topic, and Junior standing or above. Contact the Dean’s office for information.
  
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    ECON 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1-3 sem. hrs. Individual supervised study and a final report. Prerequisites: permission of instructor, Junior standing or above, and others depending on selected topic. Inquire at the Dean’s office for information.
  
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    ECON 4398 - Internship in Economics

    3 sem. hrs. Supervised full-time or part-time, off-campus training in a service, manufacturing, or public sector position. Oral and written reports required. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 12 semester credit hours toward a Minor in Economics, and Junior standing or above. Students must apply to program and be accepted prior to registration. May not be repeated for credit.

Educational Curriculum and Instruction

  
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    EDUC 2307 - Schooling in a Democracy

    3 sem. hrs. A course to enable citizens, parents, and prospective professional educators to synthesize their general education experiences/courses with current issues and practices related to teaching and learning in the United States. Career opportunities and personal commitments to the teaching profession will be explored. The systematic process of admission to the teacher education program will be initiated. Field observations in communities and schools will be required.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
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    EDUC 3311 - School and Society

    3 sem. hrs. The characteristics, organization, and management of the American School System including: The history of the development of American schools, legal and ethical issues, teaching as a profession, influence of cultural background on instruction of students, characteristics and needs of special populations, and adapting curriculum and instruction for students from special populations. A student interview with Department of Teacher Education faculty will be required. Field experiences required.
  
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    EDUC 4311 - Classroom Management: All Level

    3 sem. hrs. A study of classroom organization and management as related to basic principles of human development and learning. Preventative discipline techniques utilizing both group and individual processes are emphasized. This course is to be taken concurrently with Planning, Teaching, Assessment and Technology for All Level.
  
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    EDUC 4312 - Classroom Management: Grades 7-12

    3 sem. hrs. A study of classroom organization and management as related to basic principles of human development and learning. Preventative discipline techniques utilizing both group and individual processes are emphasized. This course is to be taken concurrently with Planning, Teaching, Assessment and Technology for Grades 8-12 Teachers.
  
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    EDUC 4313 - Classroom Management: Grades 4-8

    3 sem. hrs. A study of classroom organization and management as related to basic principles of human development and learning. Preventative discipline techniques utilizing both group and individual processes are emphasized. This course is to be taken concurrently with Planning, Teaching, Assessment and Technology for Grades 4-8 Teachers.
  
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    EDUC 4314 - Classroom Management: Grades EC-6

    3 sem. hrs. A study of classroom organization and management as related to basic principles of human development and learning. Preventative discipline techniques utilizing both group and individual processes are emphasized. This course is to be taken concurrently with Planning, Teaching, Assessment and Technology for Grades EC-6 Teachers.
  
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    EDUC 4321 - Instructional Design for Special Populations: All Level

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the characteristics and needs of special student populations in a culturally diverse society. Special populations emphasized will include special education, gifted and talented, at-risk, and bilingual.  Instructional strategies, differentiating curriculum, and diversifying assessment will be examined in relation to special populations.  This course is to be taken concurrently with student teaching.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100; Distance Education Fee $75
  
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    EDUC 4322 - Instructional Design for Special Populations: Grades 7-12

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the characteristics and needs of special student populations in a culturally diverse society. Special populations emphasized will include special education, gifted and talented, at-risk, and bilingual. Instructional strategies, differentiating curriculum, and diversifying assessment will be examined in relation to special populations. This course is to be taken concurrently with student teaching.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100; Distance Education Fee $75
  
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    EDUC 4323 - Instructional Design for Special Populations: Grades 4-8

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the characteristics and needs of special student populations in a culturally diverse society. Special populations emphasized will include special education, gifted and talented, at-risk, and bilingual. Instructional strategies, differentiating curriculum, and diversifying assessment will be examined in relation to special populations. This course is to be taken concurrently with student teaching.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100; Distance Education Fee $75
  
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    EDUC 4324 - Instructional Design for Special Populations: Grades EC-6

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the characteristics and needs of special student populations in a culturally diverse society. Special populations emphasized will include special education, gifted and talented, at-risk, and bilingual. Instructional strategies, differentiating curriculum, and diversifying assessment will be examined in relation to special populations. This course is to be taken concurrently with student teaching.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100; Distance Education Fee $75
  
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    EDUC 4390 - Special Topics

    1-3 sem. hrs. Topics in Curriculum and Pedagogy will be explored at the request of participants or faculty with the approval of the Department Chair, Dean, and Curriculum Coordinating Committee (CCC).
  
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    EDUC 4605 - Planning, Teaching, Assessment and Technology for All Level Teachers

    6 sem. hrs. A study of planning, teaching, assessment and technology as they relate to teaching in grades EC-12.  Planning will include general curriculum issues, the lesson cycle, multiple intelligences, learning styles and resources.  Teaching will include methods and strategies for delivery of instruction and classroom environment.  Assessment will focus on traditional and authentic alternative assessment. Technology will cover media and techniques from transparencies to computer technology, and will incorporate the skills and knowledge for using the microcomputer to plan and develop presentations, instructional materials, and learning activities in the public school curriculum. Observation and collaboration with professional teachers in the field, as well as journal writing, will be integral parts of the course. Two full days per week are required at a partner school site. A student may enroll in this course for a maximum of 2 times only; and it must be completed during the Fall or Spring semesters in order to successfully complete all requirements. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education. Successful completion of SMTE 1350 and READ 3320. Successful completion of SMTE 3315 or SMTE 3316. Successful completion of thirty-nine (39) hours of general education requirements. This course will provide at least 6 hrs. of TExES preparation.
  
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    EDUC 4606 - Planning, Teaching, Assessment and Technology for Grades 7-12 Teachers

    6 sem. hrs. A study of planning, teaching, assessment and technology as they relate to teaching in grades 7-12. Planning will include general curriculum issues, the lesson cycle, multiple intelligences, learning styles and resources. Teaching will include methods and strategies for delivery of instruction and classroom environment. Assessment will focus on traditional and authentic alternative assessment. Technology will cover media and techniques from transparencies to computer technology, and will incorporate the skills and knowledge for using the microcomputer to plan and develop presentations, instructional materials, and learning activities in the public school curriculum. Observation and collaboration with professional teachers in the field, as well as journal writing, will be integral parts of the course. Two full days per week are required at a partner school site. A student may enroll in this course for a maximum of 2 times only; and it must be completed during the Fall or Spring semesters in order to successfully complete all requirements. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education. Successful completion of thirty-nine (39) hours of general education requirements. This course will provide at least 6 hrs. of TExES preparation.
  
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    EDUC 4607 - Planning, Teaching, Assessment and Technology for Grades 4-8 Teachers

    6 sem. hrs. A study of planning, teaching, assessment and technology as they relate to teaching in grades 4-8.  Planning will include general curriculum issues, the lesson cycle, multiple intelligences, learning styles and resources.  Teaching will include methods and strategies for delivery of instruction and classroom environment.  Assessment will focus on traditional and authentic alternative assessment. Technology will cover media and techniques from transparencies to computer technology, and will incorporate the skills and knowledge for using the microcomputer to plan and develop presentations, instructional materials, and learning activities in the public school curriculum. Observation and collaboration with professional teachers in the field, as well as journal writing, will be integral parts of the course. Two full days per week are required at a partner school site. A student may enroll in this course for a maximum of 2 times only; and it must be completed during the Fall or Spring semesters in order to successfully complete all requirements. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education. Successful completion of SMTE 1350 and READ 3321. Successful completion of SMTE 3315 or SMTE 3316. Successful completion of thirty-nine (39) hours of general education requirements. This course will provide at least 6 hrs. of TExES preparation. 
  
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    EDUC 4608 - Planning, Teaching, Assessment and Technology for Grades EC-6 Teachers

    6 sem. hrs. A study of planning, teaching, assessment and technology as they relate to teaching in grades EC-6.  Planning will include general curriculum issues, the lesson cycle, multiple intelligences, learning styles and resources.  Teaching will include methods and strategies for delivery of instruction and classroom environment.  Assessment will focus on traditional and authentic alternative assessment. Technology will cover media and techniques from transparencies to computer technology, and will incorporate the skills and knowledge for using the microcomputer to plan and develop presentations, instructional materials, and learning activities in the public school curriculum. Observation and collaboration with professional teachers in the field, as well as journal writing, will be integral parts of the course. Two full days per week are required at a partner school site. A student may enroll in this course for a maximum of 2 times only; and it must be completed during the Fall or Spring semesters in order to successfully complete all requirements. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education. Successful completion of SMTE 1350 and READ 3320. Successful completion of SMTE 3315 or SMTE 3316. Successful completion of thirty-nine (39) hours of general education requirements. This course will provide at least 6 hrs. of TExES preparation. 

Education/Student Teaching

  
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    EDUC 4392 - Student Teaching: EC-Grade 6

    3 sem. hrs. Laboratory experiences and directed teaching in grades EC-Grade 6. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. Must be taken with EDUC 4693 Student Teaching: Grades 7-12
  
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    EDUC 4393 - Student Teaching: Grades 7-12

    3 sem. hrs. Laboratory experiences and directed teaching in grades 7-12. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. Must be taken with EDUC 4692 Student Teaching: EC-Grade
  
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    EDUC 4394 - Student Teaching: EC-Grade 6

    3 sem. hrs. Laboratory experiences and directed teaching in grades EC-Grade 6. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. Must be taken with EDUC 4693 Student Teaching: Grades 7-12
  
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    EDUC 4692 - Student Teaching: EC-Grade 6

    6 sem. hrs. Laboratory experiences and directed teaching in grades EC-Grade 6. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. Must be taken with EDUC 4393 Student Teaching: Grades 7-12.
  
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    EDUC 4693 - Student Teaching: Grades 7-12

    6 sem. hrs. Laboratory experiences and directed teaching in grades 7-12 in the student’s teaching field(s). Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.
  
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    EDUC 4694 - Student Teaching: EC-Grade 6

    6 sem. hrs. Laboratory experiences and directed teaching in grades EC-Grade 6. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. Must be taken with EDUC 4393 Student Teaching: Grades 7-12.
  
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    EDUC 4696 - Directed Individual Study

    1‑6 sem. hrs. Programs will be designed for individual cases through special permission of the Department Chair and Dean. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.
  
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    EDUC 4699 - Teaching Internship

    6 sem. hrs. An internship designed for inservice teachers seeking certification under the post baccalaureate program. Grade assigned will be “credit” (CR) or “no credit” (NC). Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.
  
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    EDUC 4992 - Student Teaching: Grades 4-8

    9 sem. hrs. Laboratory experiences and directed teaching in grades 4-8 in the student’s teaching field(s). Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.
  
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    EDUC 4993 - Student Teaching: Grades 7-12

    9 sem. hrs. Laboratory experiences and directed teaching in grades 7-12. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.
  
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    EDUC 4994 - Student Teaching: EC-grade 6

    9 sem. hrs. Laboratory experiences and directed teaching in an EC-Grade 6 classroom. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.

Elementary Education

  
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    ELEM 3324 - Child Development and Appropriate Practices

    3 sem. hrs. Provides the student with an overview of the physical, social, emotional, and psychological development of children from infancy through early childhood.
  
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    ELEM 4345 - EC-6 Assessment and Evaluation

    3 sem. hrs. lecture A study of assessment for children EC-6 utilizing both formal and informal instruments will be addressed. A knowledge of choosing, administering, and reporting developmental assessment will be explored with an emphasis on assessment tools that can be used by teachers of young children. Principles of designing and using assessment and evaluation techniques that are culturally fair, intellectually sound, reliable, and content-valid for young children. Differentiation among criterion-referenced, norm-referenced, individual, informal, authentic, and group assessments will be emphasized. Students will review strategies for using assessment data to design instruction, and match assessment techniques to individual children and learning situations
  
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    ELEM 4350 - Social Studies

    3 sem. hrs. This course will expose students to skills and concepts taught in the Social Studies curriculum in the elementary school. Developmentally appropriate strategies, concepts, and curricular materials used in teaching the Social Studies will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Completion of ECED 3324, EDCI 3311 (or EDCI 5305 for MAC students) with the grade of “C” or better and completion or concurrent enrollment in ECED 3380.
  
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    ELEM 4696 - Directed Individual Study

    1-6 sem. hrs. Programs will be designed for individual cases through special permission of the Department Chair and Dean. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

English

  
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    ENGL 0001 - Grammar I

    0 sem. hrs. Grammatical structures that enable students to better comprehend and use academic English are the focus of the course. Students will learn to appreciate the relevance of acquiring and applying grammatical knowledge to express themselves confidently and appropriately in different academic situations, as well as social situations relevant to the American college context.
  
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    ENGL 0002 - Listening and Speaking I

    0 sem. hrs. This course provides short and focused activities to help students improve their English listening and speaking skills. It includes practice in both mastering the larger message and key words, phrases and specific sounds to assist students in developing better speaking and comprehension skills. Students will practice giving academic presentations as well as practice speaking in small groups and individually.
  
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    ENGL 0003 - Reading I

    0 sem. hrs. In this course, students will develop the reading skills essential for academic learning and inquiry in the context of authentic academic reading tasks. Students will work to build fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary skills through extensive and intensive reading tasks of increasing complexity. Contemporary academic and literary texts will be used to develop students’ critical reading and vocabulary, writing, listening, and speaking skills.
  
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    ENGL 0004 - Writing I

    0 sem. hrs. In this course, students will learn and apply the writing skills essential for academic success including sentence, paragraph, and basic essay writing. This course is aimed at students planning to study, or are already studying, at university level in English.
  
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    ENGL 0005 - Recitation I

    0 sem. hrs. This course provides students with a structured, scheduled academic environment providing the opportunity to complete assignments and work closely with their language instructor. Instructors utilize materials from student courses to facilitate activities and discussions that will increase comprehension of academic material and further students’ abilities to work independently in academic settings. Each week, the course will focus on the language skills and vocabulary needed for the students’ courses. Additionally, there will be a focus on study skills and time management needed for success in academic settings. Students will leave the course better equipped for university level academic course work and a thorough understanding of time management and appropriate study habits for the university.
  
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    ENGL 0011 - Grammar II

    0 sem. hrs. This course will focus on high-intermediate grammatical structures that enable students to better comprehend and use academic English. Students will learn to appreciate the relevance of acquiring and applying grammatical knowledge to express themselves confidently and appropriately in different academic situations, as well as social situation relevant to the American college context.
  
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    ENGL 0012 - Listening and Speaking II

    0 sem. hrs. In this course, students will learn and apply the listening, note-taking, and presentation skills essential for academic learning, inquiry, and communication in the context of authentic academic listening and speaking tasks. Students will work to build fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary skills through extensive and intensive listening tasks of increasing complexity. Contemporary academic lectures and seminars will be sued to develop students’ critical thinking skills.
  
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    ENGL 0013 - Reading and Writing II

    0 sem. hrs. In this course, students develop and apply the reading skills essential for academic learning and inquiry, in the context of authentic academic reading tasks. Students will work to build fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary skills through extensive and intensive reading tasks of increasing complexity.

    Those course will serve as preparation for college composition course and any writing intensive courses. There will be a number written tasks and prompts that will stimulate free writing practice and introduce students to various styles of writing. Students will also use these written tasks to develop editing skills through the writing process. The final project will be a collection of these written tasks in the form of a portfolio.


  
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    ENGL 0016 - College Life

    0 sem. hrs. College Life focuses on the study skills necessary for students to be successful in an American university setting. Students will develop critical skills and strategies for incorporating researched materials into written work, working in groups, giving presentations, navigating an American university campus, and building language skills through immersion in the new culture. In addition, students will prepare for their future careers through the Career Ahead Program. Interactive activities on campus require learners in the course to use and understand college-level academic English. This course will equip students with the skills to survive and thrive in a new academic setting, and more importantly, provide the opportunity to examine and reposition students’ learning, organization, and time management skills to enable them to become successful students.
  
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    ENGL 0022 - Listening and Speaking III

    0 sem. hrs. In this course students will learn and apply listening, note-taking, and presentation skills essential for academic learning, inquiry, and discourse in the context of authentic academic listening and speaking tasks. Students will work to build fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary skills through extensive and intensive listening tasks of increasing complexity. Contemporary academic lectures and seminar will be used to develop students’ critical thinking skills.
  
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    ENGL 0023 - Reading and Writing III

    0 sem. hrs. In this course students will improve upon and apply the reading skills essential for academic learning, inquiry, and discourse in the context of authentic academic reading tasks. Students will build vocabulary through extensive and intensive reading tasks of increasing complexity.

    Contemporary academic tests about writing will be used to develop students’ critical reading, academic vocabulary, and complex writing skills. There will e a number of in-class written tasks and prompts that will stimulate free writing practice and introduce students to various styles of writing. Students will also use these written tasks to develop editing skills through the writing process. The final project will be a collection of these written tasks in the form of a portfolio.


  
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    ENGL 0036 - US Culture

    0 sem. hrs. This course will offer English Language Learners a means for analyzing and evaluating the complex social and moral issues that are specific to the social and moral landscape of the United States. As students examine their own cultures and compare them with others, culture shock and cultural conflict may be lessened and appreciation for cultural differences may be strengthened. Students will engage in interactive tasks, including researching and case analysis of topics and social, academic and professional issues, especially those suggested by the extensive reading component of this course. Through the process of reading, discussion, analysis and writing students in this class will enrich their understanding of today’s global society while at the same time they are sharpening their academic English skills.
  
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    ENGL 0037 - Critical Thinking

    0 sem. hrs. The purpose of this course is to develop the critical thinking skills needed to interpret and assess arguments and information. This course will highlight the language skills essential for critically analyzing and discussing the quality of the information and opinions presented in authentic texts and listening selections. The course will concentrate on detecting errors of reasoning in short and long passages, evaluating evidence in written and verbal arguments, detecting logical inconsistencies, removing vagueness and ambiguity through word choice and phrasing, and identifying the point or purpose of someone’s remarks. Through examining these topics, students will be able to thoughtfully respond to others’ opinions in a clear, logical, and informed way. Students will leave the course better prepared to collect, synthesize, and evaluate information and feel more confident in presenting their perspectives in an academic setting.
  
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    ENGL 0099 - Integrated Reading and Writing Non-Course Based Development

    0-5 sem. hrs. (0:0) ENGL 0099 is designed to develop student’s critical reading and academic writing skills on an individualized basis through tutoring. The course fulfills TSI requirements for reading and writing. TSI compliance staff will approve each student for this course. Approval is based on test score and/or by academic standing.
  
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    ENGL 0399 - Integrated Reading and Writing

    3 sem. hrs. A portfolio-based course  with required tutoring (lab) time focused on the writing and reading processes, including strategies for invention, revision, and editing, and techniques of active reading, such as analysis, inference, summary, and evaluating texts. Students will enter ENGL 0399 through Texas Success Initiative (TSI) mandated remediation. (Not counted toward graduation) (Co-Requisite: ENGL 1301)
  
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    ENGL 1301 - Composition I

    3 sem. hrs. Principles, techniques, and processes of written composition, textual analysis, and critical thinking. TCCNS Equivalent: ENGL 1301
    Satisfies the university core curriculum requirement in composition

  
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    ENGL 1302 - Writing and Rhetoric

    3 sem. hrs. Introduces students to writing studies, rhetoric, and academic research (information literacy).  Students will read, apply, and reflect on the current research and scholarship in writing studies, especially threshold concepts, kinds of knowledge about writing, and rhetoric.  Students will learn how to transfer, deepen, and extend their ability to use writing in various contexts. TCCNS Equivalent: ENGL 1302
    Satisfies the university core curriculum requirement in composition

    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
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    ENGL 2316 - Literature and Culture

    3 sem. hrs. Introduction to literatures that raise aesthetic, cultural, social, and/or political issues that affect and reflect the human condition across regions, cultures, and nations.  Sample topics:  Crossing Borders, The City in Literature, Islands and Islanders, Science and Fiction.  TCCNS Equivalent: ENGL 2331
    May be used to satisfy the university core requirement in Language, Philosophy, and Culture.

    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100; Distance Education Fee $75
  
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    ENGL 2332 - Literature of the Western World: From the Classics to the Renaissance

    3 sem. hrs. Study of important literary texts from the Ancient World to the Renaissance. TCCNS Equivalent: ENGL 2332
    May be used to satisfy the university core curriculum requirement in literature.

    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
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    ENGL 2333 - Literature of the Western World: From the Enlightenment to the Present

    3 sem. hrs. Study of important literary texts from the Enlightenment to the present. TCCNS Equivalent: ENGL 2333
    May be used to satisfy the university core curriculum requirement in literature.

    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
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    ENGL 2370 - Introduction to Literary Studies

    3 sem. hrs. An introduction to literary analysis and scholarship for the intermediate writer. Emphasis placed on genres of literature, literary research, and expository and analytical composition. Familiarizes students with the various disciplines and related conversations within English Studies. Should be taken by sophomore-level English majors in the Literary Studies emphasis, and by Literary Studies and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 .
  
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    ENGL 3301 - Technical and Professional Writing

    3 sem. hrs. A course designed to help students gain practical experience in finding and interpreting information and writing reports and documents for specialized audiences in the technical and professional world. ENGL 3301 will be held in a computer-assisted classroom. Prerequisites: Core Communication Component Area complete or permission from instructor.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
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    ENGL 3302 - Techniques of Creative Writing

    3 sem. hrs. Introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical experience used in creative writing. Focuses on poetry, creative nonfiction, and short fiction. For all majors. Prerequisites: Core Communication Component Area complete or permission from instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3303 - Introduction to Writing Studies

    3 sem. hrs. This course will review current scholarship on writing studies, including threshold concepts, activity theory, and genre studies. It will consider various perspectives on the uses of writing to provide students with an intellectual and practical understanding of writing. This course provides a starting point for the more specific studies of writing that occur in other writing studies courses. Prerequisites: Core Communication Component Area complete or permission from instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3310 - Technical and Professional Writing for Computer Science

    3 sem. hrs. Designed specifically for computer science majors, this course focuses on developing students ability to (1) use writing to communicate effectively with a range of audiences about technology; (2) identify, analyze, and appropriately integrate relevant information in their writing; (3) make informed judgments about their uses of writing based on ACM’s and IEEE’s code of ethics; and (4) develop their ability to function effectively individually and as members of a team to establish goals, plan tasks, meet deadlines, manage risk, and produce deliverables. 
  
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    ENGL 3321 - Film and Literature

    3 sem. hrs. Studies the connections between the formal elements of literature and of film, with emphasis on theme, narrative style, and genre. By viewing films based on literary sources, students will analyze how literature is adapted into film as well as identify strategies to view and read critically. For all majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 and ENGL 2332, 2333, 2334, or 2335.
  
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    ENGL 3323 - Young Adult Fiction

    3 sem. hrs. Literary study of young adult literature through analysis, discussion, and interpretation. The course emphasizes literary issues connected with society, culture, history, and genre.
  
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    ENGL 3325 - Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature

    3 sem. hrs. In recent decades, it has become common to study literature in light of other disciplinary perspectives-and to study other disciplines as they are depicted in literature. From these interdisciplinary approaches has emerged a distinct mode of analysis that examines texts within their broader social and cultural milieu. In this course students will earn to use cross-disciplinary methods to interpret literature and culture. Topics will vary, but may include Religion, Medicine, and American Literature, Disability Narratives in the Eighteenth Century, Trauma and the City in Twentieth-Century Literature.
  
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    ENGL 3330 - Current Events and Literature

    3 sem. hrs. This course examines literature in the context of current issues and events. Students will place literature in conversation with social, political, and cultural trends as a means of engaging with and understanding these trends and the debates associated with them. Using reading, writing, and discussion as modes of critical inquiry, students will discover the critical role that literature plays in representing, responding to, and shaping current events.
  
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    ENGL 3339 - Introduction to Linguistics

    3 sem. hrs. Introductory survey course covering phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, neurolinguistics, and language acquisition.
  
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    ENGL 3340 - Grammar

    3 sem. hrs. Presents a general descriptive overview of English grammar and provides a structural framework for analyzing English sentences.
  
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    ENGL 3341 - British Literature before 1800

    3 sem. hrs. Study of significant works of poetry, drama, and prose before 1800 with emphasis on historical context and the exploration of literary and cultural values through written texts. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENGL 2370 , or ENGL 3303 , or instructor approval.
  
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    ENGL 3345 - British Literature since 1800

    3 sem. hrs. Study of significant works of British poetry, drama, and prose since 1800 with emphasis on historical context and the exploration of literary and cultural values through written texts. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENGL 2370 , or ENGL 3303 , or instructor approval. 
  
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    ENGL 3348 - Drama

    3 sem. hrs. A genre-oriented study of dramatic literature, using a wide range of texts. Variable content.
  
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    ENGL 3349 - Poetry

    3 sem. hrs. A genre-oriented study of poetry using a wide range of texts. Variable content.
  
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    ENGL 3354 - American Literatures before 1900

    3 sem. hrs. Study of significant works of American poetry, drama, and prose from the country’s pre-European beginnings to 1900 with emphasis on historical context and the exploration of literary and cultural values through written texts. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENGL 2370 , or ENGL 3303 , or instructor approval. 
  
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    ENGL 3355 - American Literatures since 1900

    3 sem. hrs. Study of significant works of American poetry, drama, and prose from 1900 to the present with emphaisis on historical context and the exploration of literary and cultural values through written texts. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENGL 2370 , or ENGL 3303 , or instructor approval. 
  
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    ENGL 3360 - Current Approaches to Composition and Literature

    3 sem. hrs. Prepares prospective teachers to create developmentally appropriate learning environments and tasks that enable student success in writing and the study of literature in Language Arts and English courses.  Prepares students to meet the increased writing and reading expectations in all subject areas, including their own writing.  Prerequisite: One Reading Course.
  
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    ENGL 3361 - Strategies and Genres of Advanced Writing

    3 sem. hrs. Students will practice-writing in situated contexts (such as their majors, careers, and/or other professional interests) and across genres to develop more advanced and reflective writing strategies. By studying theories of writing; engaging in writing as a craft; and drafting, revising, and editing texts; students will refine and become more reflective in their writing processes. 
  
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    ENGL 3362 - Creative Writing Workshop: Survey and Practice of Genres

    3 sem. hrs. Develops students’ skills as critics and writers of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction in a workshop setting. For all majors. Prerequisite: Core Communication Component Area complete or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3363 - Foundations of Rhetoric

    3 sem. hrs. This course will study the historical and theoretical development of rhetoric through the works of principal thinkers. Students will analyze rhetorical concepts in their relation to civic, cultural, political, and pedagogical developments and the construction of knowledge and will use rhetorical concepts to produce logical, ethical, and moral arguments. Prerequisites: Core Communication Component Area complete or permission from instructor.
  
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    ENGL 3363.H01 - Honors Rhetoric

    3 sem. hrs.  

    A study of the historical and theoretical development of rhetoric within the works of principal thinkers in the classical period, the Enlightenment, and the contemporary period. The analysis of rhetorical concepts in their relation to civic, cultural, political, and pedagogical developments and the construction of knowledge.


  
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    ENGL 3364 - Strategies of Writing Creative Nonfiction

    3 sem. hrs. Explores the uses of creative nonfiction through reading and writing about published works of experienced writers and scholars in the field and practicing a variety of creative nonfiction techniques and genres (e.g. literary journalism, memoir, and the personal narrative). Prerequisite: Core Communication Component Area complete or permission of instructor.
    For all Majors.

  
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    ENGL 3365 - Second Language Acquisition

    3 sem. hrs. This course is an introduction to second language acquisition.  The course is designed to be accessible to students from a wide variety of backgrounds and no basic knowledge of the linguistic structure of English will be assumed.  This course will address issues related to how second language is learned by both children and adults.
  
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    ENGL 3366 - Language in Society

    3 sem. hrs. An introduction to the study of language as a function of several societal variables. Introduces basic concepts of language such as linguistic varieties, dialect, speech communities, and linguistic attitudes.
  
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    ENGL 3367 - TESOL Seminar

    3 sem. hrs. This course presents an introduction to and a critique of current and traditional methodologies of teaching English to speakers of other languages, with emphasis on aural comprehension; speaking, reading, and writing skills; testing and assessment; and linguistic-cultural differences.  This course is open to all majors, but is required for students seeking the Certificate in TESOL.   or Approval of Instructor
  
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    ENGL 3369 - Topics in Linguistics

    3 sem. hrs. Exploration of topics such as second language acquisition, language assessment, history of English, and contrastive analysis. May be repeated when topics vary.
 

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