Oct 01, 2020  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Environmental Science

  
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    ESCI 4498 - Internship in Environmental Science

    2 sem. hrs. (Ind study) Two to four semester hours of credit may be earned by working in an internship position in a governmental agency or industry. Prerequisite: senior environmental science majors only; requires approval of the faculty.
    May be repeated for credit. Fall, Spring, Summer.


Educational Technology

  
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    IDET 3100 - Educational Technology for Preservice Teachers in Schools

    1 sem. hrs. This field-based integrated course is designed to provide educators with an overview of basic resource tools and instructional methods to be considered when designing and developing educational technology integrated curriculum plans. This field-based infused seminar will look at basic integrated applications in creating electronic portfolios for all students. Aspects of online collaborative tools and their pedagogical implications in EC-12 environments will also be incorporated.
  
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    IDET 3310 - Technology Applications for Teachers

    3 sem. hrs. This course enables preservice and inservice teachers to effectively use computer-based technology for instructional and professional purposes, and provides participants with the skills and knowledge required for teacher certification in Texas.

Finance

  
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    FINA 1307 - Personal Finance

    3 sem. hrs. Covers the foundations of financial planning, managing basic assets, managing credit, managing insurance needs, managing investments, and retirement and estate planning. This course is designed for nonbusiness as well as business majors to give them a basic understanding of the aspects of personal financial planning. TCCNS Equivalent: FINA 1307
  
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    FINA 3310 - Financial Management

    3 sem. hrs. A survey of financial management issues emphasizing planning and decision making. Specific topics covered include discounted cash flow analysis, stock and bond valuation, financial intermediation, organizing, raising and managing capital, capital investment, risk analysis, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, BUSI 0011, MATH 1325, or equivalent and Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 3312 - Financial Markets and Institutions

    3 sem. hrs. Course coverage includes an analysis of financial markets and institutions; regulation, money market operations, global impact of central banking principles and monetary policy, and determinants of interest rates with financial asset pricing. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 3320 - Intermediate Corporate Finance

    3 sem. hrs. The study of asset pricing, capital budgeting, capital management, growth through mergers, and leasing. Emphasis is on the development of problem-solving capabilities. Prerequisites: FINA 3310 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 3331 - Investments

    3 sem. hrs. Framework of financial markets, valuation of the firm, security analysis, investment equity versus debt, efficiency of market evaluation, diversification efforts, investment goals, and portfolio selection. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, MATH 1325 or equivalent and Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 3335 - Financial Modeling

    3 sem. hrs. This course will cover the use of spreadsheet analysis in financial applications and introduce students to spreadsheet tools and functions to conduct business and personal financial analysis, valuation of bonds and stocks, and financial forecasting.
  
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    FINA 3350 - Cash Management

    3 sem. hrs. An examination of the principles and methods of cash and liquidity management with particular attention to funds transfer procedures and requirements. Specific topics include the role of cash management in corporate financial management, a review of relevant accounting concepts, the structure of the financial environment, the system of disbursements and collections, accounts receivable management, accounts payable management, information technology and electronic commerce, cash flow forecasting, short-term investing and borrowing, financial risk management, international treasury management, and management of relationships. Prerequisites: FINA 3310 or consent of instructor and Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 3351 - Insurance Principles

    3 sem. hrs. Fundamentals of risk management as practiced in the commercial life, health, property, and casualty insurance industries. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 3354 - Real Estate Principles

    3 sem. hrs. Fundamentals of real estate including site selection, legal processes and documents, financing, value determination, management, and marketing. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 3355 - Employee Benefits and Retirement Planning

    3 sem. hrs. This course examines the financial aspects of retirement planning as well as employee benefit planning including group insurance plans and the characteristics of the various types of employee benefit plans: life insurance, medical expense, disability, and retirement income. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above
  
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    FINA 4310 - Advanced Financial Management

    3 sem. hrs. Application of financial management tools, examination and interpretation of financial statements, and integration of financial policy and structure on overall management of the enterprise. Prerequisites: FINA 3320 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 4315 - International Finance

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the institutions and relationships of the international financial system as it relates to the balance of payments, foreign exchange risk, arbitrage and the Eurocurrency market. The emphasis is on methods of arbitrage, forecasting exchange rates, and hedging against foreign exchange risk. Prerequisites: ECON 2301, ECON 2302, FINA 3310, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 4321 - Financial Institutions Management

    3 sem. hrs. A study of major financial institutions and the markets in which they operate, with emphasis on financial decision making and risk management. Topics include financial intermediation theory; measurement and management of interest rate risk, credit risk, off-balance-sheet risk, foreign exchange risk, country risk, and liquidity risk; capital adequacy; and product/market diversification. Prerequisites: FINA 3310, ECON 2302, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 4330 - Introduction to Derivative Securities

    3 sem. hrs. Course coverage includes an analysis of financial derivative contracts. The class includes options, futures and forward contracts; in particular comodity trading and hedging strategies will be covered in detail. Swaps and Interest Rate Options will be included in the presentation if time permits. (Prerequisites:   or equivalent or approval of instructor).
  
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    FINA 4332 - Security Analysis and Portfolio Management

    3 sem. hrs. Evaluation of investment securities of both private and public institutions through external analysis of financial statements and economic conditions, portfolio selection, expected return and risk selection, and conditions of market efficiency. Prerequisites: FINA 3310, FINA 3331, ORMS 3310, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 4334 - Financial Statement Analysis

    3 sem. hrs. A detailed study of financial reporting with emphasis upon practical interpretations. Attention will be given to financial statement analysis using financial accounting information and its finance implications. Assignments may differ depending on major. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, ACCT 2302, FINA 3310, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    FINA 4390 - Current Topics in Finance

    1-3 sem. hrs. Selected topics for special study related to finance functions, processes or issues. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above, and others depending on topic. Contact the Dean’s office for information.
  
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    FINA 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1-3 sem. hrs. Individual supervised study and completion of a final report. Prerequisites: permission of instructor, Junior standing or above, and others depending on selected topic. Inquire at the Dean’s office for information.
  
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    FINA 4398 - Internship in Finance

    3 sem. hrs. Supervised full-time or part-time, off-campus training in business or government finance office. Oral and written reports required. Prerequisites: finance major, and Junior standing or above. Students must apply to program and be accepted prior to registration. May not be repeated for credit.

French

  
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    FREN 1311 - French I

    3 sem. hrs. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills within a French cultural framework. For students without previous knowledge of the language. (Language laboratory required. One hour per week minimum.) A lab fee is required for this course. TCCNS Equivalent: FREN 1311
  
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    FREN 1312 - French II

    3 sem. hrs. Continued practice in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills within a French cultural framework. French 1311 or equivalent required. (Language laboratory required. One hour per week minimum.) A lab fee is required for this course. TCCNS Equivalent: FREN 1312
  
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    FREN 2311 - French III

    3 sem. hrs. Reviews French grammar through oral and written practice with emphasis on language proficiency. Utilizes cultural readings in French to expand vocabulary and knowledge of the French culture. TCCNS Equivalent: FREN 2311
  
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    FREN 2312 - French IV

    3 sem. hrs. Continued advanced development and review of all language skills within a French framework with an emphasis in the linguistic perspective. Successful completion of 2311 is required to receive credit for 2312. TCCNS Equivalent: FREN 2312
  
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    FREN 3306 - French Lit 1800 to Present

    3 sem. hrs. This course will deal with a short story, a novel, a film script and a play written by three of the big names from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, two men and a woman. Each work deals in its way with the relationships between men and women, loneliness and alienation, faith and other modern considerations. (Teleconference course)

Geography

  
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    GEOG 1300 - World Geography

    3 sem. hrs. This is a survey course of the major regions of the world. The significant physical and cultural aspects of each region will be covered. TCCNS Equivalent: GEOG 1300
  
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    GEOG 1470 - Geographic Information Systems I

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Introduction to topics in modern geography, including elements of Physical Geography (studies of the atmosphere, ocean, and land, surface environments) and an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GISC). A significant part of course work will include computer-assisted mapping and GISC assignments. Prerequisite or corequisite: COSC 1315. (Credit may not be given for both this course and GISC 1470.)
  
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    GEOG 3331 - Geography of North America

    3 sem. hrs. This course introduces the five themes in geography and uses these themes to analyze the relationships between the physical and cultural aspects of the United States. The textbook information will be supplemented with satellite images and visual materials to enhance the learning experience of the student.

Geology

  
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    GEOL 1303 - Essentials of Geology

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) One-semester introductory Earth science course for students majoring in a non-science subject area. Covers basic geologic material and concepts, such as minerals, rocks, the rock cycle, and plate tectonics theory. Origin, composition, and evolution of our planet, as well as the importance of  geology in everyday life, including geologic resources, global change, earthquakes, and volcanism are examined. This course is not recommended for students majoring in Geology or Environmental Sciences. Course counts toward the natural science component of the University Core Curriculum Programs . TCCNS Equivalent: GEOL 1303 Physical Geology
    Fall, Spring, Summer (on sufficient demand).

  
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    GEOL 1403 - Physical Geology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Introduction to the origin, classification, and composition of Earth materials. Study of internal and surface processes which shape and modify Earth. Laboratory studies of minerals and rocks, as well as topographic maps, geologic maps and geologic cross-sections. Corequisite:  SMTE 0094  Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course. TCCNS Equivalent: GEOL 1403.
    This course counts toward the natural science component of the University Core Curriculum.Fall, Spring (on sufficient demand).

  
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    GEOL 1404 - Historical Geology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Introduction to the origin and evolution of Earth and other planets. Changes in the form and distribution of Earth’s continents and oceans, and succession of plants and animals through geologic time. Laboratory studies of fossils, geological maps, and the interpretation of ancient environments of rock formation. Prerequisite: GEOL 1403 or GEOL 1303. Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course. TCCNS Equivalent: GEOL 1404.
    This course counts toward the natural science component of the University Core Curriculum.Spring.

  
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    GEOL 2101 - Geological Field Explorations

    1 sem. hrs. (0:2) Introduction to basic field skills in geology and other field-based sciences. Basic techniques in safe field practices, collection of field observations, note taking, and scientific reasoning. Two- to four-day field excursion to areas that display a variety of geologic phenomena within Texas. Field trip destinations may vary from year to year. Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Fall.

  
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    GEOL 2102 - Undergraduate Seminar in Geology-Careers in the Geosciences

    1 sem. hrs. (1:0) Introductory level seminar featuring diverse topics and speakers. Focus on careers in the geosciences as well as on how to successfully plan a college career. In-house as well as external speakers. May not be repeated for credit but attendance in subsequent semesters is encouraged.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 2103 - Undergraduate Seminar in Geology-Research in the Geosciences

    1 sem. hrs. (1:0) Introductory level seminar featuring diverse topics and speakers. Focus on current geologic research. In-house as well as external speakers. May not be repeated for credit but attendance in subsequent semesters is highly encouraged. Credit/no credit
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 2490 - Selected Topics

    1-4 sem. hrs. (1-4 : 0-6) May be repeated for credit if topics are significantly different. Subject material variable. Faculty approval required.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 3326 - Introduction to Geological Field Methods

    3 sem. hrs. (2:3) Introduction to the basic techniques of geological fieldwork. Note taking in the field, proper use of geological field equipment, measurement and description of rock sections by several methods and degrees of detail, plus small area mapping of several types of terrain with topographic maps. Reports, sections, and maps will be produced from the field notes. Field trips required. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403, GEOL 1404, and GEOL 3411 (may be taken concurrently).  Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Spring.

  
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    GEOL 3329 - Geology of National Parks

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Introduction to the regional geology of the United States using selected U.S. National Parks representing a wide variety of geologic settings as examples. Application of major geologic principles and basic geologic concepts such as plate tectonics, rock cycle, stratigraphy, and geologic time. Prerequisite: GEOL 1303, or GEOL 1403, or GEOL 1404.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 3411 - Mineralogy

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Study of the physical and chemical properties of minerals. Introduction to the crystallography of minerals, optical mineralogy, and the use of the polarized light microscope. Laboratory study of mineral identification in hand specimens and thin sections. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403, CHEM 1411, and CHEM 1412 (may be taken concurrently).  Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Fall.

  
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    GEOL 3414 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Genesis and occurrence of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Mineralogical composition and thermodynamics of geologic systems. Determination of rock types in hand specimens and thin sections.Prerequisites:     . Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Spring.

  
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    GEOL 3441 - Invertebrate Paleontology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Morphology, classification, and paleoecology of fossil invertebrates. Applications to marine geology including paleoceanography, stratigraphy, economic geology. Field trip to Texas invertebrate fossil beds. Prerequisite: GEOL 1404 or permission of instructor. Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Fall.

  
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    GEOL 3442 - Geomorphology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Study of landscapes and landforms at the surface of the Earth, and the processes and mechanisms by which they are developed. Prerequisite: GEOL 1403 or permission of instructor.  Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Fall.

  
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    GEOL 3443 - Environmental Geology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Study of the relationships of humans to Earth’s physical environment. Geologic aspects of waste disposal, resources, conservation, land reclamation, geologic hazards, and land-use planning. Prerequisite: GEOL 1403, and science major or minor, or permission of instructor.  Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Fall (on sufficient demand), Spring.

  
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    GEOL 3490 - Selected Topics

    1‑4 sem. hrs. May be repeated for credit if topics are significantly different. Subject materials variable. Faculty approval required.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4050 - Geology Field Safety Seminar

    0 sem. hrs. Restricted to geology majors attending field camp. Students required to meet with geology program coordinator prior to registration for this course.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4311 - Paleoclimatology

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Reconstruction of Earth’s climate system through time using natural archives and proxy evidence. Focus is mostly towards the Quaternary, though longer time spans will be considered, too. Mixed format with lectures, hand-on activities involving paleoclimate data sets, and seminar-style readings and discussions. Prerequisites:  ,   
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4316 - Marine Geoscience

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Introduction to the geology of the marine environment. Review of plate tectonic processes relevant to the evolution of continental margins and plate boundaries; geophysics and ocean morphology; geology of ocean crust; controls on the types, origin, and distribution of marine sediments; marine geochemistry; nearshore geological processes and the continental shelf; introduction to paleoceanography; global paleoceanographic evolution; critical events in ocean history. Special focus on the Gulf of Mexico. Prerequisites:        
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
  
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    GEOL 4322 - Geophysics

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Introduction to quantitative techniques to assess physical properties and processes of the Earth. Topics include earthquake seismology, refraction and reflection seismology, gravimetry, magnetism, electrical methods, and radioactivity of Earth materials. Application of geophysical methods to the study of the Earth, in oil and gas exploration, and in economic and environmental geology. Prerequisites: GEOL 4421, PHYS 1401 or 2425, PHYS 1402 or 2426, MATH 2413, or permission of instructor.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4326 - Field Seminar in Geology

    3 sem. hrs. (1:4) Designed to prepare students for summer field camp. Basic techniques of geologic mapping in the field, data analysis and interpretation, and report writing. Prerequisites: GEOL 4411 and GEOL 4421. Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4411 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Composition and origin of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Description and classification of rocks in hand specimen. Principles of stratigraphy, including stratigraphic units and correlation. Facies models for major depositional systems. Field trips. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403 , GEOL 1404 , GEOL 3411  (may be taken concurrently) and GEOL 3442 , or permission of instructor.  Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Spring.

  
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    GEOL 4415 - Economic Geology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Study of geologic and tectonic parameters of mineral and metals formation. Ore geology and geochemistry. Mining, processing, fabrication, and marketing of natural resources. Field trip to mining operations. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403  and GEOL 3411 .  Corequisite:  SMTE 0094 Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4416 - Introduction to Geochemistry

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Introductory study of the Earth processes using principles of chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, isotope geochemistry and organic geochemistry. Applications of low-temperature geochemistry to geologic problems. CHEM 1411 , CHEM 1412 , MATH 2413 ,and  GEOL 3411 , or instructor’s permission.  Corequisite:  SMTE 0094  Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4421 - Structural Geology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) PHYS 1401  Geometric and quantitative description of deformation of the Earth’s crust, mechanics of brittle and crystal-plastic deformation processes of Earth materials, introduction to continuum mechanics of geologic systems, crustal deformation from micro-scale to global tectonics. Laboratory introduces principles of three-dimensional data representation and analysis, geologic map interpretation, cross-section techniques, and problems in stress and strain analysis. Prerequisites: GEOL 3411 , MATH 2413 , and PHYS 1401   or PHYS 2425 .  Corequisite:  SMTE 0094  Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Spring.

  
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    GEOL 4430 - Internship in Geology

    1‑4 sem. hrs. (Independent Study) One to four semester hours of credit may be earned by working in an internship position in industry, with local government, a private firm, or an independent geologist. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior geology majors only; requires approval of the geology faculty.
    May be repeated for credit, but only four semester hours will count towards degree. Spring, Summer, Fall.

  
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    GEOL 4436 - Introduction to Petroleum Geology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Basic concepts of petroleum geology and techniques used in the exploration and production of hydrocarbon systems. Lectures and lab exercises will cover principles of stratigraphy, sedimentology, hydrocarbon generation, hydrocarbon-trapping mechanisms, reservoir characterization, seismic interpretation, well-log interpretation, and geologic risk analysis. Prerequisites: GEOL 4411  (may be taken concurrently). Recommended: GEOL 4322   and GEOL 4421 .  Corequisite:  SMTE 0094  Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4444 - Hydrogeology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) Introduction to the fundamentals of groundwater and surface water flow; well hydraulics and evaluation of groundwater as a resource; chemical properties of groundwater and groundwater contamination; groundwater and the environment; and groundwater modeling. This course also examines some of the techniques associated with field hydrogeology and laboratory methods in hydrogeology. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403 , PHYS 1401  or PHYS 2425 , and MATH 2413 , or permission of instructor. Corequisite:  SMTE 0094  Geology Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4490 - Selected Topics

    1‑4 sem. hrs. May be repeated for credit if topics are significantly different. Subject materials variable. Faculty approval required.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    GEOL 4496 - Directed Independent Study

    1‑4 sem. hrs. Requires a formal proposal of study to be completed in advance of registration and to be approved by the supervising faculty, the chairperson, and the Dean of the College.
    Spring, Summer, Fall.

  

German

  
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    GERM 1311 - German I

    3 sem. hrs. Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills within a German cultural framework. For students without previous knowledge of the language. (Language laboratory required. One hour per week.) A lab fee is required for this course. TCCNS Equivalent: GERM 1311
  
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    GERM 1312 - German II

    3 sem. hrs. Continued practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills within a German cultural framework. German 1311 or equivalent required. (Language laboratory required. One hour per week.) A lab fee is required for this course. TCCNS Equivalent: GERM 1312
  
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    GERM 2311 - German III

    3 sem. hrs. Reviews German grammar through oral and written practice with emphasis on language proficiency. Utilizes cultural readings in German to expand vocabulary and knowledge of the German culture. TCCNS Equivalent: GERM 2311
  
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    GERM 2312 - German IV

    3 sem. hrs. Continued advanced development and review of all language skills within a German framework with an emphasis in the linguistic and cultural perspective. Successful completion of 2311 is required to receive credit for 2312. TCCNS Equivalent: GERM 2312

Geographic Information Science

  
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    GISC 1301 - Physical Geography and Mapping

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) The goal of this course is to encourage you to think geographically, examining the interactions between physical systems and human activities. Introduction to topics covered include elements of Physical Geography (studies of atmosphere, ocean and land surface environments), Geographic Information Systems (computer systems that capture, analysis, and display of geographic information), and human environmental interactions. (Students may not receive credit for both this course and GEOG 1301 - Physical Geography and Mapping .) TCCNS Equivalent: GEOG 1301
    This course counts toward the life and physical sciences foundational component area of the University Core Curriculum.

  
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    GISC 1336 - Digital Drafting and Design

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) An introduction to graphic and drafting principles and practices in surveying and mapping science. This course includes the development of the basic drafting skills needed to produce surveying plats and graphical presentations. The elements of descriptive geometry are addressed. A major component of the course is an introduction to the fundamentals of computer-aided drafting and design (CADD). Spring.
  
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    GISC 1470 - Geospatial Systems I

    4 sem. hrs. (3:3) Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) and its theoretical foundations.  Topics covered include vector and raster data models, acquisition and manipulation of data, cartography,  current topics, data quality, and basic spatial analysis.  Principles and uses of GIS software also covered. Fall and Spring.
  
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    GISC 2250 - Field Camp I

    2 sem. hrs. (0:6) A one-week field camp with intensive field data collection and computations. Traversing between control points. Digital contour data and leveling control. Detail spatial data by total station. Construction set out using total station and steel band. Taken during the sophomore or junior year. Spring. Prerequisite: GISC 2470.
  
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    GISC 2301 - Geospatial Systems II

    3 sem. hrs. (2:3) An intermediate level course in the concepts and applications of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics covered include spatial database design and management, raster analysis, terrain mapping, analysis, and applications.  Spring. Prerequisite: GISC 1470 - Geospatial Systems I  .
  
  
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    GISC 2470 - Geospatial Plane Measurement I

    4 sem. hrs. (2:4) Historical introduction to field measurement and mapping; distance measurement using electronic distance meters; calibration and reduction. Leveling instruments; principles, construction, testing and adjustment; ancillary equipment. Optical and electronic theodolites. Traverse computations and adjustment. Coordinate systems. Map projections. Fall. Prerequisite:   or  .
  
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    GISC 3300 - Geospatial Mathematical Techniques

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Characteristics of geographic/spatial information; overview of relevant sections of numbers, algebra and geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, matrices, determinants and vectors, curves and surfaces, integral and differential calculus, partial derivatives, with an emphasis on geospatial applications. Concepts of geospatial coordinate systems and geospatial coordinate transformations; overview of spatial statistics and best-fit solutions with geospatial applications. Prerequisite: MATH 2413 - Calculus I  and MATH 3342 - Applied Probability and Statistics . Fall.
  
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    GISC 3325 - Geodetic Science

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) History of geodetic measurement. Description of the geodetic model of the earth. Relationship between the ellipsoid, geoid, and earth’s surface. Measurement of long baselines. Gravity and the geoid. Relationship between terrestrial observations and grid coordinates. Spring. Prerequisite: GISC 2470 - Geospatial Plane Measurement I  .
  
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    GISC 3412 - Geospatial Plane Measurement II

    4 sem. hrs. (2:4) Principles and reduction of observations and errors in spatial measurement. Techniques of horizontal and vertical angle measurement for precise positioning. Trigonometric heighting and vertical staff tacheometry. Setting out of structures. Design and computation of horizontal and vertical curves. Spring. Prerequisite: GISC 2470 - Geospatial Plane Measurement I  and co-requisite GISC 1336 - Digital Drafting and Design .
  
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    GISC 3420 - Geospatial Software Systems II

    4 sem. hrs. (3:3) Advanced programming course focusing on the design and implementation of GIS scripts and GIS web applications.  Topics covered include GIS web applications, web mashups, GIS scripts, GIS tool creation, and advanced user interface design and implementation. Spring. Prerequisite: GISC 2438 - Geospatial Software Systems I  .
  
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    GISC 3421 - Visualization for GIS

    4 sem. hrs. (3:3) Basic elements of thematic cartography, cartographic theory, and cartographic projections. Integration of cartographic principles with GIS visualization. Principles of map design with GIS data. Spring. Prerequisite: GISC 2301 - Geospatial Systems II  .
  
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    GISC 4180 - Geospatial Systems Internship

    1 sem. hrs. (1:0) Internship education requires work with approved Geospatial Systems related industry employer. Students provide weekly written reports and final presentation to program at the end of internship. Must have completed 60 semester hours before attempting. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
  
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    GISC 4305 - Legal Aspects of Spatial Information

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Legal ownership of spatial data and information collected in the public sector. Public access to large digital databases. Copyright law as applied to spatial data. Legal issues related to property boundaries, statutory boundaries, voter district boundaries, and jurisdictional boundaries. Government fees and charges for access to spatial data. Social and economic value of spatial data. Spring. Prerequisite: GISC 2470.
  
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    GISC 4315 - Satellite Positioning

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) Global reference systems. Use of satellite for navigation and positioning systems. History and review of satellite positioning systems. Measurement techniques using GPS. Point, differential, and kinetic positioning techniques. Error sources in satellite positioning. Future trends in satellite positioning technology. Fall. Prerequisites: GISC 2470 - Geospatial Plane Measurement I  and MATH 2413 - Calculus I  .
  
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    GISC 4318 - Cadastral Systems

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) Land ownership recording systems used in Texas and U.S. Investigation and research for artificial and natural boundaries. Title searches at county court house, title plants, and the Texas General Land Office. Other sources for cadastral research. Riparian and littoral boundaries. Boundary marking and preparation of cadastral plans. Metes and bounds descriptions. Writing field notes. Urban and rural cadastral issues. Use of coordinate systems in cadastral mapping. Fall. Prerequisite: GISC 2470 - Geospatial Plane Measurement I  .
  
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    GISC 4320 - Hydrography

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) Introduction to offshore and inshore hydrographic mapping. Tidal datums and their computation. Review of hydrographic and nautical charts. Electronic position finding and bathymetric data collection. Echo sounding, side scan sonar. Seafloor mapping and underwater locating. Beach (combined land and hydrographic) mapping. Spring even years. Prerequisites: GISC 2470 and MATH 2413.
  
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    GISC 4326 - Geomatics Professional Practice

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) An intensive one-week summer course presented by practicing geomatics professionals covering many of the aspects of operating a professional surveying practice in the State of Texas. Topics cover surveyor responsibility and liability, the surveyor in court, standards of practice, surveying mathematics, Texas coordinate system, celestial observations, and project control. Prerequisite: GISC 2250.
  
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    GISC 4335 - Geospatial Systems III

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) Advanced spatial analysis and modeling in GIS. Topics covered include exploratory analysis of spatial data, network analysis, spatial point patterns, area objects and spatial autocorrelation, and spatial interpolation. Also covers new approaches to spatial analysis. Fall. Prerequisite:

      and   and MATH 3342 - Applied Probability & Stats .

     


  
  
  
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    GISC 4351 - Geospatial Systems Project

    3 sem. hrs. (0:0:6) This course allows students to employ knowledge attained in other courses to create a project to spatially analyze information of interest to you and your field of study.  Students will either undertake a GIS project to manage, analyze, and visualize spatial data, or a survey project in cadastral, topographic, engineering, hydrographic, or geodetic positioning survey. Spring. Prerequisite:   or   
  
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    GISC 4371 - History of Texas Land Ownership

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) History of land and legal systems in Texas, including influences by Spain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, and the State of Texas. Nature of land development in Texas. History of surface and mineral land tenure in Texas. Evolution of principles of land ownership boundary determination in Texas. Spring. Prerequisite:   
  
  
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    GISC 4590 - Selected Topics

    1-5 sem. hrs. May be repeated for credit depending on topic. Variable content.
    Offered on request.

  
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    GISC 4596 - Directed Independent Study

    1-5 sem. hrs. See College description. Offered on request. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    GISC 4690 - Co-operative Education

    1 sem. hrs. Co-op education allows students to take time off their full-time studies to gain valuable experience-based learning with employers willing to put on students for a semester (14 weeks), six months, or over the summer. The Co-op program allows students to maintain their full-time status as a student (continue health insurance coverage with parents, not effect student loan repayment, access to college activities, etc.) while undertaking work in their field of interest. The Co-op program is a partnership between the employer, the student, and the university. Prerequisite: acceptance by Cooperative Education Coordinator.

Graphic Design

  
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    GRDS 1301 - Foundations of Graphic Design

    3 sem. hrs. This course explores fundamental components of design theory, concept, and composition. Students will explore presentation techniques, printing processes, technical tactile skills associated with the field, defining and exploring a targeted audience, and appropriate software introductions.  Students will create printed works utilizing these skill sets.
  
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    GRDS 1302 - Typography I

    3 sem. hrs. Through the use of lectures, demonstrations and studio work stu­dents are introduced to the art of typography. An emphasis is placed on the history of type, anatomy of letter forms and appropriate uses of prescribed type faces. Hand rendering and digital media are used.
  
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    GRDS 2301 - Historical Perspectives of Graphic Design

    3 sem. hrs. This studio course examines the history of graphic design from the invention of writing to present day composition.  Students will explore various movements in graphic design history and create design works that reflect these periods.
  
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    GRDS 2302 - Design Studio I

    3 sem. hrs. 3:0 This course introduces the fundamental principles of the graphic design industry.  Students strengthen their vocabularies in design, theory, and visual communication.  Exploring various two-dimensional projects, students will conduct research, form opinions, foster ideas, solve communication problems, learn to analyze and discuss graphic design work, and continue to develop their own creative process. Prerequisites:    and  .
  
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    GRDS 3301 - Typography II

    3 sem. hrs. Through readings, writing assignments, lectures, and studio projects, students explore the relationship of type to cultural, political, and psychological dynamics of information exchange.  The ideas of intellectual impact, complex hierarchy, active/passive readership, and emotional expression are all explored with the emphasis on user experience in typographic design. Prerequisites:   ,  ,  , and  .
  
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    GRDS 3302 - Design Studio II

    3 sem. hrs. This course encourages students to further develop their design process by reflecting on their own personal and artistic identities, while identifying and communicating to a specific audience.  Through a series of print and three-dimensional projects, students work to balance their own voice and develop strong conceptual thinking and formal experimentation methods. Prerequisites:   ,  ,  , and  .
  
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    GRDS 3303 - Design for Good

    3 sem. hrs. The studio course examines the role of design in society, specifically investigating areas that affect well-being, cultural intelligence and political propaganda.  The topics in this course are explored through lectures, independent research and the creative development of body of work. Prerequisites:   ,  ,  , and 2302 .
  
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    GRDS 3305 - Packaging Design

    3 sem. hrs. This studio course will teach students how to develop creative strategies for problem solving in a client-based environment.  Focusing on three-dimensional packaging, students will learn how design applies to various surfaces, products, and audiences. Prerequisites:   ,  ,  , and  .
 

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