Jan 15, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Management Information Systems

  
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    MISY 4340 - Electronic Commerce Management

    3 sem. hrs. A broad overview of electronic commerce topics as they relate to various users. General coverage includes electronic commerce history, opportunities, limitations, and risks. Technical discussions include the internet, intranets, extranets, firewalls, security, protocols, servers, and browsers. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above.
  
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    MISY 4350 - Business Intelligence and Analytics

    3 sem. hrs. Overview of important concepts of business intelligence, and the use of analytics, technologies, applications and processes used by organizations to gain data-driven insights.  These insights and predictions can be used to aid decision-making and performance management across functional areas, including marketing, operations, and finance.  Students will learn to extract and manipulate data, and create reports, scorecards and dashboards, including mobile apps. ONLY Juniors or Post-Baccalaureate or Seniors for MISY 4350
  
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    MISY 4365 - Data Warehousing and Data Mining for Business Intelligence

    3 sem. hrs. In the information age, organizations can and do collect massive amounts of data. Yet organizations are often “data rich” but “information and knowledge poor”. This course is designed to prepare business professionals who, by using analytical methods and data mining and data visualization tools such as XLMiner, SAP Lumira and SAP Hanna, will be able to harness the potential of data by extracting business intelligence that can be used to improve decisions and operations at various points in the value chain. Prerequisites:  MISY 2305, MISY 3330, ORMS 3310, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    MISY 4375 - IT Project Management

    3 sem. hrs. 3:0 This course covers issues related to managing projects in organizations. The course focuses on the management of projects and working as a team. Students are expected to draw on materials from other management information system courses, especially the System Analysis and Design, and Database Management courses. Prerequisites: MISY 3330 (Database Managment) 
     
  
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    MISY 4390 - Current Topics in Management Information Systems

    1-3 sem. hrs. Selected topics for special study related to management information systems. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above, and others depending on topic. Contact the Dean’s office for information.
  
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    MISY 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1-3 sem. hrs. Individual supervised study and a final report. Prerequisites: permission of instructor, Junior standing or above, and others depending on selected topic. Inquire at the Dean’s office for information.
  
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    MISY 4398 - Internship in Management Information Systems

    1-3 sem. hrs. Supervised practical experience in business computer systems. Prerequisites: MIS major, Junior standing or above, and others depending on selected internship. Students must be accepted prior to registration. May not be repeated for credit.

Marketing

  
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    MKTG 3310 - Principles of Marketing

    3 sem. hrs. The initial course in Marketing. Description and analysis of the flow of goods, services and ideas to consumers and industrial users. Factors outside the firm are also considered as they affect marketing decisions. Prerequisite: BUSI 0011 and Junior standing or above. 
  
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    MKTG 3311 - Salesmanship: Concepts and Practices

    3 sem. hrs. An introduction to professional salesmanship as a marketing tool. Emphasis is placed on the theory and application of the professional selling process. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.
  
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    MKTG 3315 - Advertising and Promotional Strategy

    3 sem. hrs. The student will learn about the development and implementation of a coordinated and integrated advertising and promotions strategy. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships among advertising, sales management, and sales promotion activities.
      Prerequisites: MKTG 3310 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    MKTG 3320 - Basic Advertising

    3 sem. hrs. Advertising concepts and a critical analysis of commercial advertising practices. Students apply advertising concepts in projects such as case studies, campaign evaluations, and simulation exercises. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.
  
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    MKTG 3325 - Entrepreneurial Marketing

    3 sem. hrs. Entrepreneurial marketing provides entrepreneurs and small business owners with the knowledge needed to successfully perform marketing activities (primarily promotion) on a very low budget. Students will learn the utilization of techniques and the analysis of market characteristics that impact the small entrepreneurial organization, its products and services. Additionally, students will learn how to develop specific yet flexible marketing plans and activities, and the effective management of practices, finances, and obligations associated with the marketing of smaller entrepreneurial firms. Factors inside and outside the firm are researched and analyzed as they affect successful small business marketing decisions. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above and/or permission of the instructor for non-business majors.
  
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    MKTG 3330 - Consumer Behavior

    3 sem. hrs. An examination of the psychological and social influences that affect consumer decision making. Emphasizes the development of marketing programs designed with behavioral considerations in mind. Prerequisites: MKTG 3310 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    MKTG 3333 - Marketing on the Internet

    3 sem. hrs. This course introduces students to the theories, strategies, tools, and techniques of effective online marketing. The course emphasizes the essential concepts, methods, technologies, and decision making criteria for business-to-business and business-to-consumer Internet marketing. The broad concepts of ethics, social responsibilities, sustainability, and globalization are integrated through the course. Topics include online marketing research, business intelligence, Web site design, and Internet marketing strategy. Prerequisites:   (or equivalent) and Junior status. NOTE: This course was previously offered as MKTG 4390: Current Topics in Marketing: Internet Marketing. Students may NOT earn credit toward their degree for both classes.
  
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    MKTG 3340 - Retail Management

    3 sem. hrs. A managerial approach to retailing. Topics such as trade area evaluation, buying, layout, pricing, cost and expense analysis are considered. Prerequisites: MKTG 3310 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    MKTG 3345 - Sales Management

    3 sem. hrs. An exploration of the problems and practices of sales and sales management. Organizational structure and development of programs to assure a competent and effective sales force are stressed. Prerequisites: MKTG 3310 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    MKTG 4310 - Distribution Systems in Marketing

    3 sem. hrs. An analysis of the development of integrated distribution systems. Topics include retail and wholesale institutions, channel conflict and cooperation, channel control, franchising and emerging developments in distribution channels. Prerequisites: MKTG 3310 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    MKTG 4320 - Marketing Research and Analytics

    3 sem. hrs. The study of research in marketing with emphasis on the collection and interpretation of data and its application to the solution of marketing problems. Prerequisites: ORMS 3310, MKTG 3310, 6 hours of advanced marketing, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    MKTG 4340 - International Marketing.

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the economic, social and cultural environment of international marketing. The course focuses on marketing decision making in this environment. Prerequisites: MKTG 3310 and Junior standing or above, or permission of instructor.
  
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    MKTG 4350 - Marketing Problems and Policies

    3 sem. hrs. Capstone course in Marketing. The development and implementation of marketing strategy. The development of marketing programs that affect and are affected by the competitive environment. Prerequisites: MKTG 3310, nine additional hours of upper-division marketing, and Senior standing.
  
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    MKTG 4360 - Social Media Marketing

    3 sem. hrs. A comprehensive study of Social Marketing strategy and implementation. The course explores the tools, techniques, and strategic logic used in the development and implementation of social media marketing strategy. The course also describes and defines the logic models used for specific plans and programs that affect and are affected by the technology and competitive environments. Prerequisites: MKTG 3310, and Senior standing.
  
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    MKTG 4390 - Current Topics in Marketing

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Selected topics for special study related to marketing functions, processes, or issues. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above, and others depending on topic. Contact the Dean’s office for information.
  
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    MKTG 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1-3 sem. hrs. Individual supervised study and a final report. Prerequisites: permission of instructor, Junior standing or above, and others depending on selected topic. Inquire at the Dean’s office for information.
  
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    MKTG 4398 - Internship in Marketing

    3 sem. hrs. Supervised full-time or part-time, off-campus training in business or government organization. Oral and written reports required. Prerequisites: marketing major, and Junior standing or above. Students must apply to program and be accepted prior to registration. May not be repeated for credit.

Military Science

  
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    MSCI 1170 - Leadership and Personal Development Lab

    1 sem. hrs. Lab The lab component explores the practical applications of the lessons being taught in the classroom.  Students will participate as a team member through a variety of group exercises and tactical scenarios.  The emphasis is on exploring, and developing skills in decision-making that the student will need in their advanced classes.  The lab continues to building on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation, individual, squad, and platoon tactics. Concurrent enrollment in MSCI 1370.
  
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    MSCI 1171 - Introduction to Tactical Leadership Lab

    1 sem. hrs. Lab The lab component explores the practical application of the lessons being taught in the classroom.  Students will participate as a team member through a variety of group exercises and tactical scenarios.  The emphasis in on exploring, and developing skills in decision-making that the student will need in their advanced classes.  The lab continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation, individual, squad, and platoon tactics. Concurrent enrollment in MSCI 1371.
  
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    MSCI 1370 - Leadership and Personal Development

    3 sem. hrs. MSCI 1370/MSL 1301 introduces you to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. You will learn how the personal development of life skills such as goal setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management related to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions, attributes and core leader competencies while gaining a big picture understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.
  
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    MSCI 1371 - Introduction to Tactical Leadership

    3 sem. hrs. MSCI 1371/MSL 1302 introduces leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. You will explore dimensions of leadership attributes and core leader competencies in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises.
  
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    MSCI 2170 - Innovative Team Leadership Lab

    1 sem. hrs. lab The lab component explores the practical applications of the lessons being taught in the classroom.  Students will participate as a team member through a variety of group exercises and tactical scenarios.  The emphasis is on exploring, and developing skills in decision-making that the student will need in their advanced classes.  The lab continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation, individual, squad, and platoon tactics. Concurrent enrollment in MSCI 2370.
  
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    MSCI 2171 - Foundations of Tactical Leadership Lab

    1 sem. hrs. lab The lab component explores the practical applications of the lessons being taught in the classroom.  Students will participate as a team member through a variety of group exercises and tactical scenarios.  The emphasis is on exploring and developing skills in decision making that the student will need in their advanced classes.  The lab continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation, individual, squad and platoon tactics. Concurrent enrollment in MSCI 2371.
  
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    MSCI 2370 - Innovative Team Leadership

    3 sem. hrs. MSCI 2370/MSL 201 explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework. Aspects of personal motivation and team building are practiced planning, executing and assessing team exercises. While participation in the leadership labs is not mandatory during the Military Science Level II (MSL II) year, significant experience can be gained in a multitude of areas and participation in the labs is highly encouraged. The focus continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies will provide a tangible context for learning the Soldier’s Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the contemporary operating environment.
  
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    MSCI 2371 - Foundations of Tactical Leadership

    3 sem. hrs. MSCI 2371/MSL 202 examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary operating environment (COE). This course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army Leadership Requirements Model explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. MSCI 2371 provides a smooth transition into MSCI 3303. Cadets develop greater self awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. COE case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios.
  
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    MSCI 3103 - Adaptive Team Leadership Lab

    1 sem. hrs. lab The lab component explores the practical applications of the lessons being taught in the classroom.  Students will learn to apply leadership strategies and styles as they plan, execute and assess individual and team exercises.  The emphasis is on exploring, evaluating, and developing skills in decision-making, and persuading and motivating team members in the contemporary operating environment (COE).  The lab continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies though the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation, individual, and squad tactics. Concurrent enrollment in MSCI 3303.
  
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    MSCI 3104 - Applied Team Leadership Lab

    1 sem. hrs. lab The lab component explores the practical applications of the lessons being taught in the classroom.  Students will learn to apply leadership strategies and styles as they plan, execute and assess individual and team exercises.  The emphasis is on exploring, evaluating, and developing skills in decision-making, and persuading and motivating team members in the contemporary operating environment (COE).  The lab continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation, individual, and squad tactics. Concurrent enrollment in MSCI 3304.
  
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    MSCI 3303 - Adaptive Team Leadership

    3 sem. hrs. MSCI 3303/MSL 301 this is an academically challenging course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army leadership, Officership, Army values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at the team and squad level. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a team or squad in the execution of a tactical mission during a classroom practical exercise (PE), a Leadership Lab, or during a Situational Training Exercise (STX) using Outcomes Based Training and Education (OBT&E). OBT&E will help prepare you for success at the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) which you will attend next summer.  OBT&E will also help you critically think, adapt in a complex environment, and achieve the desired results.  This course includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, and practical exercises, a mid-term exam, and a final exam. You will receive systematic and specific feedback on your leader attributes values and core leader competencies from your instructor and other ROTC cadre and MS IV Cadets who will evaluate you using the ROTC Leader Development Program (LDP) model. Prerequisite: Approval of Professor of Military Science.
  
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    MSCI 3304 - Applied Team Leadership

    3 sem. hrs. MSCI 3304/ MSL 302 this is an advanced academically challenging course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army leadership, Officership, Army values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at the team and squad level. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a team or squad in the execution of a tactical mission during a classroom PE, a Leadership Lab, or during a Situational Training Exercise (STX) using Outcomes Based Training and education (OBT&E) will help prepare you for success at the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) which you will attend next summer.  OBT&E will also help you critically think, adapt in a complex environment, and achieve the desired results as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army.  This course includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, and practical exercises, a mid-term exam, and a final exam. You will receive continued systematic and specific feedback on your leader attributes values and core leader competencies from me and other ROTC cadre and MS IV Cadets who will evaluate you using the ROTC Leader Development Program (LDP) model. Prerequisite: Approval of Professor of Military Science.
  
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    MSCI 3499 - Leadership Development Assessment Course (LDAC)

    4 sem. hrs. Four weeks of instruction and practical application in field training, demonstration of leadership capabilities, and leadership opportunities of problem analysis, decision making, and troop-leading. CR/NC only. Prerequisite: MSCI 3303, 3304 and a ROTC contracted Cadet and approval of the Professor of Military Science.
  
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    MSCI 4103 - Adaptive Leadership Lab

    1 sem. hrs. lab The lab component explores the practical applications of the lessons being taught in the classroom.  Students will learn to apply leadership strategies and styles as they plan, execute and assess individual and team exercises.  The emphasis is on coaching, mentoring, evaluating, and developing skills of younger cadets in their decision making, and ability to persuade and motivate team members in the contemporary operating environment (COE).  The lab continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation, individual, and squad tactics. Concurrent enrollment in MSCI 4303.
  
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    MSCI 4104 - Leadership in a Complex World Lab

    1 sem. hrs. lab The lab component explores the practical applications of the lessons being taught in the classroom.  Students will learn to apply leadership strategies and styles as they plan, execute and assess individual and team exercises.  The emphasis is on coaching, mentoring, evaluating, and developing skills of younger cadets in their decision making, and ability to persuade and motivate team members in the contemporary operating environment (COE). The lab continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation, individual, and squad tactics. Concurrent enrollment in MSCI 4304.
  
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    MSCI 4303 - Adaptive Leadership

    3 sem. hrs. MSCI 4303/MSL 401 is a practical application of adaptive leadership. Throughout the semester, students are assigned the duties and responsibilities of an Army staff officer and must apply the fundamentals of principles of training, the training management, the Army writing style and military decision making to weekly training meetings. During these weekly training meetings, the student will plan, execute and assess ROTC training and recruiting events. Students will study the special trust proposed to Army Officers by the US Constitution and the President of the United States–a special trust given to no other civilian professions. Students will study how Army values and leader ethics are applied in the Contemporary Operating Environment and how these values and ethics are relevant to everyday life. The student will study the Army officer’s role in the Uniform Code of Military Justice, the counseling of subordinates, administrative actions and the management of an Army Officer’s career. Students will be given numerous opportunities to train, mentor and evaluate underclass students enrolled in the ROTC Basic Course while being mentored and evaluated by experienced ROTC cadre. Prerequisite: Approval of Professor of Military Science.
  
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    MSCI 4304 - Leadership in a Complex World

    3 sem. hrs. MSCI 4304/MSL 402 explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the contemporary operating environment (COE). You will examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. You also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support.The course places significant emphasis on preparing you for BOLC II and III, and your first unit of assignment. It uses case studies, scenarios, and “What Now, Lieutenant?” exercises to prepare you to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as a commissioned officer in the United States Army. Prerequisite: Approval of Professor of Military Science.
  
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    MSCI 4305 - Advanced Problem Solving

    3 sem. hrs. Military Science special problems course designed for individual study in modern day military structure and policies. Prerequisite: Approval of Professor of Military Science.
  
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    MSCI 4696 - Military Science Directed Individual Study

    1-6 sem. hrs. Programs will be designed for individual cases through special permission of the Department Chair and Dean. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Approval of Professor of Military Science.

Music

  
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    MIND 3311 - Applications of Music Technology

    3 sem. hrs. Designed for both music majors and non-majors, this course will focus on hands-on learning in a workshop environment.  Students will gain perspective on the people, procedures, data, software and hardware associated with the creation of music.  Topics discussed include:  computer proficiency, MIDI, computer based music notation, sequencing music evaluation, music and the Internet, and current trends in music technology.
  
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    MIND 3312 - Recording Techniques I

    3 sem. hrs. Designed for both music majors and non-majors, this course is an examination of the art of audio recording.  The curriculum will cover signal flow of the mixing console as it applies to both recording and sound reinforcement; microphones and techniques of application; use of sonic effects; recording devices (Digital, and Hard Disk); synchronization formats; etc.
  
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    MIND 3313 - Recording Techniques II

    3 sem. hrs. A continuation of MIND 3312 Recording Techniques. The curriculum will cover advanced topics regarding digital console technology, power and ground related issues, studio acoustics and design, digital audio technology, multimedia and web applications, amplifiers, noise reduction, monitoring, surround sound, and mastering procedures.
  
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    MIND 3314 - Live Sound Engineering

    3 sem. hrs. Designed for both music majors and non-majors, an overview of the basic principles of sound and reinforcement and how audio can be manipulated utilizing current live sound technology.  Topics will include signal flow, microphone selection and placement, signal processing, and mixing.
  
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    MIND 3315 - Musical Acoustics

    3 sem. hrs. Designed for both music majors and non-majors, an overview of acoustics with emphasis in the areas of scientific knowledge that are relevant to music:  the physiological properties of sounds; the effect of acoustical environment; the acoustical behavior of musical instruments; and the various applications of electronics and computers to the production, reproduction, and composition of music.
  
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    MIND 3316 - Introduction to MIDI Sound Synthesis and Control

    3 sem. hrs. Designed for both music majors and non-majors, this course introduces students to the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) sequencing using computer software and keyboard synthesizers.  Students learn concepts, basic theory and techniques, and the application of MIDI techniques to the production of music.  Hands-on projects are completed using MIDI keyboard synthesizers and sequencer software.
  
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    MIND 3320 - Music Business Survey

    3 sem. hrs. Designed for both music majors and non-majors, this course is an overview of the practices and procedures of the music industry, including such topics as career possiblities, publishing, labels, marketing, and copyrights.  It also includes an overview of career options will include performer, composer, record producer and engineer, artist manager, booking agent, concert promoter, sales, marketing, and entertainment attorney.
  
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    MIND 3321 - Music Business II

    3 sem. hrs. Designed for both music majors and non-majors, this course is an in depth examination of the practices and procedures of the music industry that pertain to accounting, taxes, copyright, licensing, marketing and contracts.  The primary objective of this course is to develop a working knowledge of the music industry and to remain in compliance with the U.S. legal system.
  
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    MIND 3322 - Entertainment Law and the Music Industry

    3 sem. hrs. Designed for both music majors and non-majors, an overview of the legal practices and ramifications of United States law and its influence on the music industry.  Topics will include intellectual property, business structures, contracts, distribution regulations, and copyrights.  Legal practices for entertainment mediums will include television, film, live stage performances, recording, and publishing.
  
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    MIND 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1-3 sem. hrs. See College description.  Offered on application.
  
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    MIND 4398 - Applied Experience

    3 sem. hrs. See College description.  Offered on application.
  
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    MUSI 1116 - Aural Training I

    1 sem. hrs. A companion course to MUSI 1311, designed to strengthen the understanding of theoretical principles through the development of aural perception and skills; exercises in melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation; and drill in sight singing. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 1116
  
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    MUSI 1117 - Aural Training II

    1 sem. hrs. Continuation of MUSI 1116; a companion course to MUSI 1312. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Music Department Theory Fundamentals Placement Exam OR prior completion of MUSI 1116 and MUSI 1311 with grades of “C” or better. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 1117
  
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    MUSI 1181 - Class Piano I

    1 sem. hrs. Group instruction in piano for music majors, covering piano technique and literature, major and minor scales, transposition, sight reading, and simple harmonization of melodies. In extraordinary circumstances, students may substitute one semester of secondary applied piano for this course.  Keyboard majors accepted for degree-level study should substitute four semesters of Secondary Applied Studio. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 1181
  
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    MUSI 1182 - Class Piano II

    1 sem. hrs. Group instruction in piano for music majors, covering piano technique and literature, major and minor scales, transposition, sight reading, and simple harmonization of melodies. In extraordinary circumstances, students may substitute one semester of secondary applied piano for this course. Keyboard majors accepted for degree-level study should substitute four semesters of Secondary Applied Studio. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 1182
  
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    MUSI 1301 - Fundamentals of Music

    3 sem. hrs. Designed to teach beginning music students the basic tenet of music theory: note reading, rhythm, scales, key signatures, basic intervals and triads, and solfeggio. There are no prerequisites, and this course is open to music majors and non-music majors.
  
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    MUSI 1302 - Non-major Class Piano I

    3 sem. hrs. Group instruction in the elements of piano playing, designed for the non-major. No previous experience necessary.
  
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    MUSI 1303 - Basic Guitar I

    3 sem. hrs. Group instruction in the fundamentals of guitar playing, designed for the non-major. The student must furnish an acceptable instrument. No previous experience necessary. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 1303
  
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    MUSI 1306 - Understanding and Enjoying Music

    3 sem. hrs. A course for the non-music major. Study of selected music literature of contrasting styles and forms with emphasis on listening to music with understanding. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 1306
    Satisfies the university core curriculum requirement in fine arts.

  
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    MUSI 1307 - Elements of Musical Style

    3 sem. hrs. A survey of selected western and non-western musical styles, based upon the analysis of the characteristic use of the elements of music. Required for music majors and recommended for non-majors with a significant high school music background. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 1307
    Satisfies the university core curriculum requirement in fine arts.

  
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    MUSI 1310 - History of Rock and Roll

    3 sem. hrs. A general survey of composers, performers, and styles of rock and roll. Emphasis on understanding stylistic elements of music, including rhythm, texture, form, and harmony.
  
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    MUSI 1311 - Musicianship I

    3 sem. hrs. First principles of chord progression and phrase harmonization. Theory assessment required prior to enrollment. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 1311
  
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    MUSI 1312 - Musicianship II

    3 sem. hrs. Continuation of MUSI 1311, with a study of more advanced chord structures and their placement within the phrase through written exercises, analysis, and correlated keyboard projects. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Music Department Theory Fundamentals Placement Exam OR prior completion of MUSI 1311 and MUSI 1116 with grades of “C” or better. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 1312
  
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    MUSI 2116 - Aural Training III

    1 sem. hrs. Continuation of MUSI 1117; a companion course to MUSI 2311. Designed to further the understanding of advanced theoretical principles and techniques through related aural exercises, dictation, and sight singing. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 1117 and MUSI 1312 with grades of “C” or better. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 2116
  
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    MUSI 2117 - Aural Training IV

    1 sem. hrs. Continuation of MUSI 2116; a companion course to MUSI 2312. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 2116 and MUSI 2311 with grades of “C” or better. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 2117
  
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    MUSI 2181 - Class Piano III

    1 sem. hrs. Group instruction in piano for music majors, covering piano technique and literature, major and minor scales, transposition, sight reading, and simple harmonization of melodies. In extraordinary circumstances, students may substitute one semester of secondary applied piano for this course. Keyboard majors accepted for degree-level study should substitute four semesters of Secondary Applied Studio. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 2181
  
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    MUSI 2182 - Class Piano IV

    1 sem. hrs. Group instruction in piano for music majors, covering piano technique and literature, major and minor scales, transposition, sight reading, and simple harmonization of melodies. In extraordinary circumstances, students may substitute one semester of secondary applied piano for this course. Keyboard majors accepted for degree-level study should substitute four semesters of Secondary Applied Studio. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 2182
  
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    MUSI 2302 - Non-major Class Piano II

    3 sem. hrs. Extension of skill development begun in MUSI 1302 Non-Major Class Piano I. Prerequisite: successful completion of MUSI 1302 or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUSI 2303 - Basic Guitar II

    3 sem. hrs. Extension of skill development begun in MUSI 1303 - BASIC GUITAR I. The student must furnish an acceptable instrument. Prerequisite: successful completion of MUSI 1303 or prior permission of instructor.
  
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    MUSI 2311 - Musicianship III

    3 sem. hrs. Continuation of MUSI 1312. A broad summary of classical and chromatic harmony, explored through written exercises, analysis, and. correlated keyboard drill. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 1312 and MUSI 1117 with grades of “C” or better. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 2311
  
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    MUSI 2312 - Musicianship IV

    3 sem. hrs. Continuation of MUSI 2311. An exploration of 20th-century techniques through written exercises, analysis, and correlated keyboard drill. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 2311 and MUSI 2116 with grades of “C” or better. TCCNS Equivalent: MUSI 2312
  
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    MUSI 3085 - Junior Recital

    0 sem. hrs. Required for all students presenting a Junior Recital in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Music in Performance Degree. Specific policies governing the presentation and evaluation of such recitals are given in the document, Preparing and Presenting Degree Recitals, available from the Music Department Chair. Requires concurrent enrollment in an appropriate Principal Studio course. Graded CR/NC.
  
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    MUSI 3162 - Diction for Singers I

    1 sem. hrs. Learning to use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) with sufficient fluency to effectively teach and learn proper pronunciation of song texts in English and French.
  
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    MUSI 3165 - Diction for Singers II

    1 sem. hrs. Learning to use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) with sufficient fluency to effectively teach and learn proper pronunciation of song texts in Italian and German.
  
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    MUSI 3166 - Woodwind Techniques I

    1 sem. hrs. Basic techniques of playing and teaching the oboe, bassoon, and saxophone. Includes a survey of pedagogical materials and basic performance literature.
    For music majors only.

  
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    MUSI 3167 - Woodwind Techniques II

    1 sem. hrs. Basic techniques of playing and teaching the flute and clarinet. Includes a survey of pedagogical materials and basic performance literature.
    For music majors only.

  
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    MUSI 3168 - Brass Techniques I

    1 sem. hrs. Basic techniques of playing and teaching the trumpet and French horn. Includes a survey of pedagogical materials and basic performance literature.
    For music majors only.

  
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    MUSI 3169 - Brass Techniques II

    1 sem. hrs. Basic techniques of playing and teaching the trombone, euphonium, and tuba. Includes a survey of pedagogical materials and basic performance literature.
    For music majors only.

  
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    MUSI 3170 - Voice Techniques for Instrumentalists

    1 sem. hrs. Group instruction and practical experience in the fundamentals of voice production and song interpretation for the instrumental music educator. Includes a survey of pedagogical materials and basic performance literature.
    For music majors only.

  
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    MUSI 3188 - Percussion Techniques

    1 sem. hrs. Basic techniques of playing and teaching the instruments of the percussion family. Includes a survey of pedagogical materials and basic performance literature.
    For music majors only.

  
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    MUSI 3189 - String Techniques

    1 sem. hrs. Basic techniques of playing and teaching the violin, viola, ‘cello, and string bass. Includes a survey of pedagogical materials and basic performance literature.
    For music majors only.

  
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    MUSI 3252 - Foundations of Music Programs

    2 sem. hrs. A survey of the historical, social, and philosophical bases of music education in the United States, psychological theories of learning and musical responsiveness, and studies of how these foundations have been applied in various types of music curricula. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 2311 and MUSI 2116 with grades of “C” or better.
  
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    MUSI 3253 - Basic Conducting

    2 sem. hrs. A skills acquisition course designed to give students competence in basic baton techniques and musical control of an ensemble. Includes score study and musical terminology. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 2311 and MUSI 2116 with grades of “C” or better.
  
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    MUSI 3310 - History of Jazz

    3 sem. hrs. A study of jazz styles, influences, trends, innovators, and literature. Readings include interviews and articles that discuss origins of jazz, definitions of jazz, and race politics of jazz. No previous experience is necessary.
  
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    MUSI 3311 - Popular and Jazz Harmony I

    3 sem. hrs. Popular and Jazz Harmony is a class designed to develop comprehensive skills in harmony, rhythm, and melody as applied to popular music and jazz idioms.  Course work is designed to develop practical knowledge in music grammer, vocabulary and structure currently utilized in a variety of professional settings as well as improve aural skills.  Curriculum is organized to assist professional musicians as well as music industry professionals.
  
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    MUSI 3334 - Music Cultures of the World

    3 sem. hrs. The course introduces the student to ethnomusicology and the cross-cultural study of music and society.  It emphasizes the role of music in human life, and explores music and performance from around the world. The student will learn about classical, folk and popular styles found on all seven continents. This course is appropriate for any student of any musical background.
  
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    MUSI 3345 - Composition

    1-3 sem. hrs. Creative writing with a view toward developing an individual style of musical composition. Variable credit, 1, 2, or 3 hrs. One private lesson per week. Prior permission of the instructor is required. Prerequisite: Prior completion of   and   with grades of “C” or better.   May be repeated for credit. Music Studio course fee schedule is applicable to this course.
  
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    MUSI 3346 - Form and Analysis of Tonal Music

    3 sem. hrs. Analysis of the melodic and harmonic design of tonal music, including the aural and visual analysis of scores for piano, voice, chamber ensembles, and orchestra. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 2312 and MUSI 2117 with grades of “C” or better.
  
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    MUSI 3354 - Advanced Conducting

    3 sem. hrs. A continuation of MUSI 3252. Advanced experiences with score preparation and effective ensemble rehearsal and management techniques. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 3252 with a grade of “C” or better.
  
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    MUSI 3370 - Class Voice

    3 sem. hrs. Group instruction and practical experience in the fundamentals of voice production, music reading, and song interpretation. Dramatic stage movement and singing will be explored using Classical and Broadway song literature. This course is designed for the non-major. No previous experience is necessary.
  
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    MUSI 4085 - Senior Recital

    0 sem. hrs. Required for all students presenting a Senior Recital in partial fulfillment of the requirements for any music degree. Specific policies governing the presentation and evaluation of such recitals are given in the document, Preparing and Presenting Degree Recitals, available from the Music Program Coordinator. Requires concurrent enrollment in an appropriate Principal Studio course. Graded CR/NC.
  
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    MUSI 4334 - History of Western Music I

    3 sem. hrs. An in-depth study of the evolution of Western musical style from antiquity through the 18th-century. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 1307, MUSI 2312, and MUSI 2117 with grades of “C” or better.
  
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    MUSI 4335 - History of Western Music II

    3 sem. hrs. Continuation of MUSI 4334, an in-depth study of the evolution of Western musical style from the age of Beethoven to the present. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 4334 with a grade of “C” or better.
  
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    MUSI 4340 - Studies in Repertoire

    3 sem. hrs. Systematic examination of the history and literature of a specific performance medium.
  
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    MUSI 4346 - Orchestration and Arranging

    3 sem. hrs. The compass, timbre, and techniques of arranging and/or orchestration for instruments and/or voices. Practical experience in arranging for orchestra, band, and other instrumental and vocal combinations. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 2312 and MUSI 2117 with grades of “C” or better.
  
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    MUSI 4355 - Music for Young Children

    3 sem. hrs. Study of musical development in children in grades K-6. Study of and practical experience with pedagogical approaches and materials appropriate for that age group. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 3252 with a grade of “C” or better.
  
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    MUSI 4357 - Choral Literature and Techniques

    3 sem. hrs. Advanced study of the literature, pedagogy, and management techniques required for successful vocal ensembles in secondary schools. Prerequisite: Prior completion of MUSI 3253 with a grade of “C” or better.
 

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