Jan 28, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
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    ACCT 2301 - Financial Accounting

    3 sem. hrs. Financial accounting concepts and their application in the accounting process for business organizations including financial statement preparation, analysis and communication of financial information.
  
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    ACCT 2302 - Managerial Accounting

    3 sem. hrs. The use of accounting information as an aid to management decision making, including performance measurement and budgets. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301.
  
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    ACCT 3311 - Intermediate Accounting I

    3 sem. hrs. An intensive study of the balance sheet accounts and the related income statement accounts. It exposes the student to the various Accounting Principles Board opinions and Financial Accounting Standards Board statements, and International Financial Reporting standards, as these publications affect the various accounts and transactions. It covers the various working capital accounts and operational assets. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 , ACCT 2302 , and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 3312 - Intermediate Accounting II

    3 sem. hrs. A continuation of Intermediate Accounting I involving current and non-current liabilities and owner equity accounts, the Statement of Cash Flows, pensions, deferred income tax, financial statement analysis and several special problem areas. Prerequisites: ACCT 3311  and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 3314 - Cost Accounting

    3 sem. hrs. A study of procedures and concepts in allocating the costs of firm inputs to outputs, determination and use of standard costs in the control function, profit planning and control techniques used in management decision-making. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, ACCT 2302, and Junior standing or above. (MISY 2305 recommended.)
  
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    ACCT 3315 - Multinational Entities: Accounting and Consolidations

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the similarities and differences between U.S. and other countries’ accounting and reporting procedures. Basic consolidation of international segments will be covered. Use of spreadsheets and web technology required. Prerequisites: ACCT 2302 and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 3316 - Governmental and Municipal Accounting

    3 sem. hrs. A study of fund accounting used in governmental entities and non-profit organizations. Emphasis on budgetary and fund accounts. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, ACCT 2302, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 3317 - Oil, Gas, & Energy Accounting

    3 sem. hrs. This course covers the basic principles of oil and gas accounting. Course topics include upstream oil and gas operations, successful efforts accounting, full cost pool accounting, accounting for production, exploration and construction, joint interest accounting, international operations, oil and taxation and analysis of oil and gas financial statements. Prerequisites:   or equivalent and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 3321 - Federal Income Tax I

    3 sem. hrs. Emphasizes the role of taxation in the business decision-making process. The course introduces the tools to conduct basic tax research and planning. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, ACCT 2302, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 3322 - Federal Income Tax II

    3 sem. hrs. Examines additional, more complex topics in business decision-making, tax research, and tax planning. Prerequisites: ACCT 3321  and Junior standing or above.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
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    ACCT 3340 - Fraud Examination

    3 sem. hrs. This course covers the basic principles of fraud examination. Course topics include the behavioral aspects of fraud and common fraud schemes including skimming, larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement, non-cash misappropriations, corruption and bribery, and fraudulent financial statements. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, ACCT 2302 or equivalent and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 3355 - Accounting Information Systems

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the role of accounting information systems and related subsystems in both for profit and not-for-profit entities. The relationship of accounting information systems to other systems, including management information systems, is addressed. Concepts are reinforced by the completion of computer-based projects. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 , ACCT 2302 , MISY 2305 , and Junior standing or above.
    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $100
  
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    ACCT 4311 - Auditing Principles and Procedures

    3 sem. hrs. Auditing principles and techniques underlying the audit process; procedures used in conducting external audits, reviews and compilations. Prerequisites: ACCT 3312, and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 4314 - Advanced Accounting Problems

    3 sem. hrs. A study of advanced accounting topics, including leases, pensions, consolidations, asset retirement obligations, accounting for not-for-profit organizations and government entities and other special problem areas. Prerequisites: ACCT 3312  and Junior standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 4345 - Ethics for Accountants and Business Executives

    3 sem. hrs. This course will cover ethical theory, ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence and other core values and regulatory requirements associated with the practice of professional accounting and decision making of other executives, with an emphasis on corporate governance in the post-Sarbanes-Oxley regulatory environment.  This course satisfies the ethics requirement of the TSCPA; however, it does not count for advanced accounting hours required to sit for the CPA exam. Students who receive credit for ACCT 4345 cannot also receive credit for ACCT 5345. Prerequisite: Junior Standing or above.
  
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    ACCT 4390 - Current Topics in Accounting

    3 sem. hrs. Selected topics for special study related to accounting functions, processes or issues. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above, and others depending on topic.
    Contact the Dean’s office for information.

  
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    ACCT 4396 - Directed Individual Study

    1-3 sem. hrs. Individual supervised study and completion of a final report. Prerequisites: permission of instructor, Junior standing or above, and others depending on selected topic.
    Inquire at the Dean’s office for information.

  
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    ACCT 4398 - Accounting Internship

    3 sem. hrs. Supervised full-time or part-time, off-campus training in public accounting, industry, or government. Oral and written reports required. Prerequisites: accounting major, and Junior standing or above with a minimum 3.00 accumulated GPA in upper division accounting courses. Student must apply to program and be accepted prior to registration. May not be repeated for credit. May not count as accounting requirement for CPA. State Board of Accountancy may not approve course as an accounting equivalent for CPA.

Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 3301 - Cultural Anthropology

    3 sem. hrs. Study of the social life of human groups from their earliest appearance to the present. Analyses of cultures include language, kinship, art, religion, economics, and political behavior. Cross-cultural comparisons allow development of generalizations about social patterns, social structure, and cultural practices found in human societies.
    (Credit may not be given for both this course and SOCI 3301.)

  
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    ANTH 3370 - Native Americans in North America

    3 sem. hrs. An ethnographic and historical analysis of Native American cultures in what is now called North America from prehistoric times to the present.
    (Credit may not be given for both this course and SOCI 3370.)

  
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    ANTH 3390 - Special Topics in Anthropology

    3 sem. hrs. Study of different topics in anthropology including biological, archaeological, cultural, or linguistic subjects. May be repeated when topics vary.
  
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    TEST 1300 - Testing course*

    3 sem. hrs. Software testing is an investigation conducted to provide stakeholders with information about the quality of the software product or service under test. *
    *^

    CIP Code
    000000Billing Hours
    123456

Arabic

  
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    ARAB 1311 - Arabic I

    3 sem. hrs. This course introduces students to listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an Arabic cultural framework. It is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Arabic. The main objective is to communicate in Arabic for understanding. This will be accomplished by learning Modern Standard Arabic as a beginner and by gaining exposure to the instructor’s dialect form of Arabic.
  
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    ARAB 1312 - Arabic II

    3 sem. hrs. This course will continue to reflect the emphasis of Arabic 1311 on Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and the spoken dialect of the instructor. Students will continue to build on the skills and strategies acquired in Arabic 1311 for all listening, reading, speaking, writing and culture modalities. In addition to increased vocabulary repertoire, a greater emphais will be placed on basic grammatical understanding, to deal with more complex sentence structure, and larger spoken and written exercises.

Art

  
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    ARTS 1301 - Art and Society

    3 sem. hrs. Designated for non-art majors. Establishes a working vocabulary for evaluating works of art in various media. Objects are interpreted in terms of their specific historical contexts and the changing relationships between art and society. This course does not fulfill the art history requirement for art majors. TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 1301
    This course satisfies the university core curriculum requirement in fine arts.

  
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    ARTS 1303 - Art History Survey I

    3 sem. hrs. An examination of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts from the ancient through medieval periods. TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 1303
    This course satisfies the university core curriculum requirement in fine arts.

  
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    ARTS 1304 - Art History Survey II

    3 sem. hrs. A further examination of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts from the Renaissance through Modern periods. Prerequisite for art majors only: ARTS 1303. TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 1304
  
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    ARTS 1311 - Design I

    3 sem. hrs. A studio course concerning the fundamentals of art with emphasis on two-dimensional concepts. Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar . TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 1311
  
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    ARTS 1312 - Design II

    3 sem. hrs. A studio course concerning the fundamentals of art with emphasis on three-dimensional concepts. Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar . TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 1312
  
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    ARTS 1316 - Drawing I

    3 sem. hrs. A studio course investigating a variety of media techniques, including their descriptive and expressive possibilities. Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar . TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 1316
  
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    ARTS 1317 - Drawing II

    3 sem. hrs. A further investigation of media techniques explored in Drawing I, including their descriptive and expressive possibilities. Prerequisite: ARTS 1316 Drawing I . Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar . TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 1317
  
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    ARTS 2311 - Design III: Color

    3 sem. hrs. Investigation of the properties of color. Color is studied and applied to studio-oriented design assignments. Prerequisites: ARTS 1303, 1304, 1311, 1312, 1316, 1317. Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar .
  
  
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    ARTS 2323 - Drawing III

    3 sem. hrs. A studio course introducing the structure and action of the human figure. Prerequisites: ARTS 1303, 1304, 1311, 1312, 1316, 1317. Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar . TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 2323
  
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    ARTS 2326 - Sculpture I

    3 sem. hrs. A studio course exploring sculptural approaches in a variety of media. Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar . TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 2326
  
  
  
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    ARTS 2356 - Photography I

    3 sem. hrs. An introductory studio course using digital cameras and image manipulation software. TCCNS Equivalent: ARTS 2356
  
  
  
  
  
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    ARTS 3304 - Intermediate Sculpture

    3 sem. hrs. A study in sculptural design and expression. Examines the structural pattern of form through the elements and principles of design. Working with classical and contemporary techniques and materials. Prerequisite: ARTS 2326 Sculpture I . Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar .
  
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    ARTS 3316 - Art Activities I

    3 sem. hrs. Practical experience with basic design, drawing, painting, and sculpture, along with a study of art history and criticism. Includes a consideration of how these experiences relate to art curricula in the elementary school. Prerequisites: Completion of lower-division art course work in design (6 sem. hrs.), drawing (6 sem. hrs.), and art history (6 sem. hrs.).
  
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    ARTS 3322 - Art Activities II

    3 sem. hrs. Practical experiences with basic design, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and crafts, along with a study of art history and criticism. Includes a consideration of how these experiences relate to art curricula in the secondary school. Prerequisites: Completion of lower-division art course work in design (6 .), drawing (6 .), and art history (6 .).
  
  
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    ARTS 3350 - Art of the United States

    3 sem. hrs. A survey of the major developments in the art of North America from Pre-Columbian times to the modern era
  
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    ARTS 3352 - Modern Art

    3 sem. hrs. A survey of the major movements of 20th century art and aesthetics, which developed primarily in Europe. Includes a review of late 19th century modernist antecedents with emphasis placed on the principal movements of the early 20th century: Fauvism, German Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Abstract Art, Dada, and Surrealism.
  
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    ARTS 3353 - Contemporary Art, 1945 to the Present

    3 sem. hrs. An examination of the dispersal of European artists and Modernism, primarily to America, as a result of World War II. Examines the development of Abstract Expressionism in New York in the 1940s and 50s, followed by a survey of recent trends in contemporary art to the present day.
  
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    ARTS 3365 - Intermediate Photography

    3 sem. hrs. An introductory studio course in traditional camera use, basic darkroom photographic processes and techniques. Prior completion of ARTS 2356 is recommended. Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar .
  
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    ARTS 4301 - Advanced Drawing

    3 sem. hrs. Emphasis on the development of content through drawing. Prerequisite: ARTS 3301. Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar .
    May be taken three times for credit.

  
  
  
  
  
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    ARTS 4350 - Pre-Columbian Art of Mesoamerica

    3 sem. hrs. Explores the history of Pre-Columbian art from Mexico and Central America, from the Olmec through the Aztec cultures.
    May be taken three times for credit.

  
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    ARTS 4352 - Modern Art of Mexico

    3 sem. hrs. Explores the history of art during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Mexico.
    May be taken three times for credit.

  
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    ARTS 4365 - Advanced Photography

    3 sem. hrs. Assumes competencies attained in ARTS 3365. Covers content as creative expression in addition to basic photographic skills. Co-requisite: SMTE 0097 Art Student Safety Seminar .
    May be taken three times for credit.

  
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    ARTS 4390 - Topics in Art History

    3 sem. hrs. May be repeated when topics vary.
  
  
  

Astronomy

  
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    PHYS 1303 - Introduction to Astronomy: Stars and Galaxies

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) This is one of two courses in the introduction to astronomy sequence which emphasizes the nature of astronomical phenomena over the mathematical analysis of them. This course will focus mostly on the nature of light, the nature and evolution of stars, the material between the stars, the Milky Way Galaxy, external galaxies, and the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. Corequisite:  SMTE 0095 - Physics Laboratory Safety Seminar   - Required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course. TCCNS Equivalent: PHYS 1303
    This course counts toward the natural science component of University Core Curriculum.Offered every Fall.

  
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    PHYS 1304 - Introduction to Astronomy: Solar System

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) This is one of two courses in the introduction to astronomy sequence which emphasizes the nature of astronomical phenomena over the mathematical analysis of them. This course introduces astronomical phenomena related to the Solar System such as apparent motion of the Sun, phases of the Moon and apparent and true motion of the planets. Main focus will be on the objects comprising the Solar System: planets, their moons, asteroids, comets and trans-Neptunian bodies. A portion of the course will be dedicated to the formation and development of the Solar System and other, extrasolar planetary systems. The course also will touch the aspects of human exploration of the Solar System and the role of technology in our learning and understanding of the Solar System. This includes the history and the basics of robotic and manned spaceflights. Corequisite:  SMTE 0095 - Physics Laboratory Safety Seminar -Required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course. TCCNS Equivalent: PHYS 1304
    This course counts toward the natural science component of University Core Curriculum.Offered every Spring and Summer.

    Billing Hours
    Distance Education Fee $50

Atmospheric Science

  
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    ATSC 2101 - Weathercasting

    1 sem. hrs. (1:0) This course is to practice in preparing and presenting weathercasts for radio and television.  The instructors of this course will provide the students with: (1) information in the form of lectures and supplemental readings; (2) opportunities to practice weathercasting on video, and (3) advice, supervision, and guidance. In lecture, students will spend most of the course learning about geography and weathercasting rules. A large portion of the course is to practice the weathercasting and report. Prerequisite  .
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    ATSC 2301 - Weather Observations

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) This course is an introduction of the basic concept of meteorology. The focus is on the measurements of the atmosphere and weather related phenomenon. The principle of the instruments used to measure temperature, pressure, moisture, radiation, precipitation and other weather related properties of the atmosphere will be introduced. The differences among the observations from in-situ, balloon borne, airborne, and satellite borne instruments will be examined and discussed. Prerequisite:  .
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    ATSC 2403 - Introduction to Meteorology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) This course is an introduction to meteorology and the dynamics of planetary atmospheres. Emphasis on atmospheric accretion, composition, evolution, structure, and dynamics. Lab exercises cover basic measurement techniques, weather maps, and forecasting. A student cannot receive credit for both this course and ESCI 3403 - Introduction to Meteorology Corequisite:  SMTE 0096  Environmental Science Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Spring (on sufficient demand), Fall.

  
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    ATSC 3305 - Physical Meteorology

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) This course will cover the fundamentals of atmospheric physics including the atmospheric composition, kinetic theory of gases, moist processes, aerosol, solar and terrestrial radiation, scattering of electromagnetic radiation and radiative transfer. Prerequisites:   and  .
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    ATSC 3306 - Atmospheric Thermodynamics

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) This course introduces a foundation in the thermodynamics of the atmosphere. After a brief review of general thermodynamics, the emphasis is given to the basic principles that are useful for the application to atmospheric problems. The course covers a number of atmospheric processes that are basically thermodynamic in nature. The specific topics include aerological diagrams, atmospheric statics, and vertical stability. Prerequisite:   and  .
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    ATSC 3401 - Synoptic Meteorology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) This course focuses on introducing middle-latitude synoptic weather phenomenon, including planet waves, frontal systems etc. We will apply principles of Dynamic Meteorology in regards to processes in the atmosphere, weather elements and forecasting. We will examine the structure and dynamics of these systems by integrating weather observations with the current state of dynamic theory, numerical weather prediction models, and the physical principles of atmospheric thermodynamics and cloud and precipitation physics. Prerequisite:  Corequisite:  SMTE 0096  Environmental Science Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    ATSC 3402 - Mesoscale Meteorology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:2) This course focuses on introducing mesoscale weather systems including thunderstorms, squall lines and hurricanes, as well as the mechanisms of tornado and lighting. The methods of observing, analyzing, and predicting these severe weather systems with the interpretation of satellite and radar images will also be introduced in this class. Prerequisite:  Corequisite:  SMTE 0096  Environmental Science Laboratory Safety Seminar required every semester for lab-based courses.  The Safety Seminar must be completed before the Census Date of the semester to participate in the lab portion of this course.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    ATSC 4301 - Dynamic Meteorology I

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) This course focuses on introductory-level atmospheric dynamics. Basic concepts of geophysical fluid dynamics and its application to a variety of atmospheric phenomena are introduced. Specific topics include the equations of motion on rotating earth, vorticity, potential vorticity, divergence, circulation theorem, and planetary wave. Prerequisites:   and  .
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    ATSC 4302 - Dynamic Meteorology II

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) This course is a continuation of ATSC 4301 (Dynamic Meteorology I), which covers the introductory-level atmospheric dynamics.  The course introduces more advance materials including equatorial waves, baroclinic and barotropic instability, two-dimensional turbulence, atmospheric teleconnection, El Nino/Southern Oscillation, Madden-Julian Oscillation, global warming, and numerical modeling of atmospheric circulations. Prerequisite:   .
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    ATSC 4305 - Remote Sensing

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) This course aims to introduce the fundamentals of satellite/airborne remote sensing techniques and demonstrates its application to various aspects of Earth Sciences. Topics include physical principles of remote sensing from ultraviolet to the microwave, radiometry, sensors and sensor technology, calibration, and environmental applications for land, ocean and atmosphere research. Prerequisite:  .
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    ATSC 4335 - Climate and Climate Variability

    3 sem. hrs. 3:0 This course intended to guide environmental science undergraduate students in developing a conceptual understanding of Earth’s global climate and its variability. Review past climates, present mean state of the climate system, climate variability from seasonal to multi-decadal time scales, and climate change.  Special attention will be given to climates of the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and surrounding land regions. Plausible climate-change scenarios, as well as mitigation and adaptation strategies will also be discussed. Prerequisite:   or  .
    Spring.

  
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    ATSC 4496 - Directed Independent Study

    1-4 sem. hrs. (1-4:0-4) Requires a formal proposal of study to be completed in advance of registration and to be approved by the supervising faculty, the Chairperson, and the Dean of the College.
    Spring, Summer, Fall.

  
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    ATSC 4498 - Internship in Atmospheric Science

    ATSC 4498 (Internship in Atmospheric Science) gives ATSC undergraduates an opportunity to obtain valuable paid or unpaid work experience related to atmospheric science, to better position them for employment after graduation. Students contract to work a specified number of hours weekly over a full semester with a state or federal agency or private industry related to atmospheric science, in return for college credit as follows:  3-6 hrs./week=1 sem. hr., 6-9 hrs./week =2 sem. hrs., 9-12 hrs./week=3 sem. hrs., 12-15 hrs./week=4 sem. hrs.  Students may contract for 1-2 sem. hrs. in a single summer session (5.5 weeks) but may contract for up to 4 sem. hrs. if carrying out internship over a regular long semester or two summer sessions (11 weeks). If interning for the summer, students should increase the number of hours interned weekly to account for the shortened period worked, so total hours interned will be equivalent to those in a regular long semester. A student may intern only twice with a single office or agency.  The internships will not apply towards graduate credit. N/A
  
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    ATSC 4590 - Selected Topics

    1-5 sem. hrs. (1-5:0-4) This course includes special topics with variable content. May be repeated for credit. Offered on sufficient demand. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
    Offered on sufficient demand.


Bilingual/ESL/Multicultural

  
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    BIEM 4344 - Educational Psychology and the Bilingual Child

    3 sem. hrs. Studies of the principles of educational psychology as applied to bilingual children.
  
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    BIEM 4345 - Language Acquisition and Development

    3 sem. hrs. A study of language acquisition and development with special reference to implications for monolingual and bilingual learners.
  
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    BIEM 4349 - Linguistics for Bilingual Teachers

    3 sem. hrs. A study of the phonological, morphological, syntactical, lexical, and semantic characteristics of contemporary Spanish and English. The course focuses on Spanish-English bilingualism.
  
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    BIEM 4351 - The Minority Child

    3 sem. hrs. Introduces students to themes and issues associated with the education of the minority child; modes of learning in various curriculum subjects; relation of materials and methods to affective and cognitive aspects of learning; information concerning the learning strengths and needs of children from various minority groups. (May be used to satisfy COE multicultural requirement.)
  
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    BIEM 4355 - Language Arts Studies in the Bilingual Curriculum

    3 sem. hrs. Basic methodological strategies and assessment skills required to teach language arts in the elementary bilingual classroom are provided. Emphasis is on teaching in Spanish.
  
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    BIEM 4356 - Content Area Studies in the Bilingual Curriculum

    3 sem. hrs. The concepts and skills required to teach health, mathematics, science, and social studies in the elementary bilingual classroom are provided.
  
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    BIEM 4357 - Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language

    3 sem. hrs. Studies in methodology and techniques available for teaching those whose native language is not English. Testing and assessment of English language learners will be integrated into the course.
  
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    BIEM 4360 - Foundations in Bilingualism

    3 sem. hrs. The philosophical and legal foundations of bilingual schooling in the United States through a sociohistorical approach. The rationale for bilingual education is examined, as are the basic program models. An overview of bilingual education in Texas is also provided.
  
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    BIEM 4393 - Field Studies in Family Literacy

    3 sem. hrs. Field experiences designed to develop skills regarding the orientation of the adult population to bilingual/ESL purposes and philosophy, improving parental involvement, and English literacy skills.
  
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    BIEM 4696 - Directed Individual Study

    3 sem. hrs. Programs will be designed for individual cases through special permission of the Department Chair and Dean. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

Biomedical Science

  
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    BIMS 2171 - Medical Terminology

    1 sem. hrs. (1:0) This course stresses familiarity with and facility in scientific terminology. Areas of focus include: an introduction to scientific terminology, word analysis, etymologies, spelling and pronunciation. Prerequisite:  BIOL 1407 - Biology II .
    Offered fall and spring semesters every year.

  
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    BIMS 2200 - Professional Skills

    2 sem. hrs. (2:0) Presentation and discussion of selected topics relating to the professional skills of practicing scientists including literature searches, reviews, paper presentation, professional opportunities and job requirements. Biomedical Sciences and Biology majors only.
    Offered fall, spring and summer semesters every year.

  
  
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    BIMS 3300 - Animal Nutrition

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) Examines the dietary requirements of both companion animals and livestock. Includes the anatomy, physiology and biochemistry of the gastrointestinal system, nutrient procurement and use, feed additives, growth stimulants, metabolic diseases, and diet therapy. Prerequisites:  BIOL 1407 - Biology II  and  CHEM 3411 - Organic Chemistry I  . Prerequisite or Corequisite  CHEM 3412 - Organic Chemistry II  .
    Offered spring semester every year.

  
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    BIMS 3301 - Introduction to Animal Science

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) This course is an orientation into animal science as it relates to agriculture and veterinary medicine. Students will also be guided on issues to ensure successful veterinary school matriculation.
    Offered fall semester every year.

  
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    BIMS 3320 - Survey of Forensic Science

    3 sem. hrs. (2:2) A survey of the methods and materials used to gather and process evidence at potential crime scenes. Students are introduced to the legal rules of evidence and their practical ramifications during scientific criminal investigations. In laboratory, students use commonly available processing items and tools to investigate a simulated crime scene. Corequisite: Safety training given in  SMTE 0092 - Biomedical Laboratory Safety Seminar  is required for continued participation in this course.
    Offered fall semester every year.

  
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    BIMS 3325 - Professional Practice in Forensic Science

    3 sem. hrs. (3:0) An introduction to industry standards and ethics for professional forensic scientists. This course analyzes cognitive processes, scientific methods and quality control/quality assurance issues in forensic investigations. It also stresses maintaining credibility in an adversarial legal system through the development of technical/scientific speaking and writing skills. Prerequisite:  BIMS 3320 - Survey of Forensic Science .
    Offered spring semester every year.

  
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    BIMS 3401 - Pathophysiology

    4 sem. hrs. (4:0) This course is a study of the biological basis of human disease. It includes an investigation of inflammation, immunity, and neoplasia, as well as the more common presenting dysfunctions of body systems. Offered every fall.Offered fall semester every year. Prerequisites:  CHEM 1411 - General Chemistry I  and either  BIOL 1407 - Biology II  or BIOL 2401 - Anatomy and Physiology I .
    Offered fall semester every year.

  
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    BIMS 3403 - Molecular Biology

    4 sem. hrs. (3:3) Principles of molecular biology including advanced concepts of gene structure, expression and regulation, chromatin structure, recombination, and current molecular biology techniques. Laboratory emphasis is on skills for recombinant DNA technology and DNA sequencing-based approaches. Prerequisites: BIOL 2416 - Genetics  and BIOL 2421 - Microbiology  .  Corequisite: Safety training given in SMTE 0092 - Biomedical Laboratory Safety Seminar  is required for continued participation in this course. 
    Offered spring semester every year.

  
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    BIMS 4111 - Contemporary Scientific Readings

    1 sem. hrs. (1:0) Students read one non-fiction book per month addressing some aspect of medicine, science or history (four books per semester), then meet once per month to discuss, analyze and defend their perceptions about the book. Only open to students accepted into the Partnership for Primary Care and the Joint Admissions Medical Program (JAMP), those who are seeking admission into JAMP by participating in the pre-JAMP and students in other sponsored programs. This course may be repeated once for full credit in subsequent semesters.
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    BIMS 4170 - Biomedical Seminar

    1 sem. hrs. (1:0) A series of seminars on current topics of biomedical research. This course may be repeated once for full credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite:  BIOL 1407 - Biology II .
    Offered on sufficient demand.

  
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    BIMS 4295 - Biomedical Practicum

    2 sem. hrs. Supervised learning experience with a community professional in health care (e.g., physician, dentist, veterinarian, chiropractor, pharmacist, physician assistant or physical therapist). On-campus meetings, oral and written reports are required. (Cannot be taken by Clinical Laboratory Science students in lieu of  CLSC 4297 - Professional Practicum I .) Prerequisite: BIOL 1407 - Biology II .  Corequisite: Safety training given in  SMTE 0092 - Biomedical Laboratory Safety Seminar  is required for continued participation in this course. 
    This course may be repeated once for full credit in subsequent semesters. Requires permission of instructor. Offered fall and spring semesters every year.

 

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